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Paper / Report Submission (General Sessions) 2018

Part of: Society for Historical Archaeology 2018


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Documents

  • 19th Century Entertainments From A Small Plantation In Alexandria, Virginia: Archaeology At Shuter’s Hill (44AX175) (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Terilee Edwards-Hewitt.

    The archaeology of childhood is underrepresented in the archaeological literature. Identifying children’s toys can be complex since many recreational objects, such as Frozen Charlottes, dominos, marbles, harmonicas and mouth harps, were used by both children and adults. Other toys found at this archaeological site are solely associated with children, primarily metal military figures and dolls. Shuter’s Hill, located in Alexandria, Virginia, was a small plantation located near Washington, D.C....

  • Advances In Laboratory and Field Use Of Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (pXRF) and LASAR ABLATION-ICPMS (LA-ICP-MS) Technologies In Field Archaeological And Combined Survey Format (CSF) Surveys (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Richard J Lundin.

    Major advances in the Laboratory and Field Use of Portable X-Rarchaeologyay Fluorescence (pXRF) and the newly developed LASAR ABLATION ICP-MS (ICP-MS) in archaeology are enabling investigators to gain new insights into the elemental and chemical content of laboratory and field samples of artifact, soil and plant materials.  Many of these advances have come directly from laboratory studies and field geochemical investigations initiatiated by mineral industry and governmental organizations and...

  • Afro-Brazilian Spaces of Worship: Late Nineteenth Century Archaeological Findings from Salvador, Bahia (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Samuel L. Gordenstein.

    This paper discusses the transformation of domestic living quarters into spaces of Afro-religious worship in Salvador, Brazil, during the late nineteenth century. This is accomplished through the presentation of historical sources that demonstrate the pervasiveness of this phenomenon, and especially, analysis of spatial and artifactual data unearthed during archaeological excavations in a house basement. The study uses historical, ethnohistorical and ethnographic analogies with present day...

  • An Analysis of the Reasons behind the Increase in Speed of Dutch and British Ships, 1750-1830 (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Patricia H Schwindinger.

    Previous studies indicate that there is a general increase in ship speed for both British and Dutch wooden sailing vessels during the time period 1750-1830. Using logbooks digitized by the Climatological Database of the World’s Oceans project (CLIWOC), this study seeks to identify the reasons behind this increase. The introduction of copper plating in the late 1700s had a significant effect on the speed of British ships, but historical documents reveal that copper plating was less frequently...

  • Analysis of Unidentified Ceramics in Historic Saint Charles, Missouri (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Gwyneth J Vollman.

    An excavation behind a bed and breakfast located on Main Street in historic downtown Saint Charles, Missouri unearthed several large, unidentified sherds of ceramics. The focus of this research is to use comparative collections, ceramic identification guides, public records, the Saint Charles County Historic Society archives, and any other necessary means of research to identify the ceramics, their possible use, and who they might have been used by. 

  • Another Brick in the Wall: A Pedagogical Approach to Excavations at a 19th -century Brickyard (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Emily E Dietrich.

    Incorporating archaeology within the high school curricula fosters an interest in archaeology and site preservation. The Milton High School Archaeology Project provides students the opportunity to experience and participate in archaeological research. At a 19th-century brickyard, students learn anthropology and their local history through hands-on excavations. Through the use of Project Based Learning (PBL) students conduct archaeological and historical research, and present their work in the...

  • Antioch Colony and the Archaeology of Texas Freedmen Descendants (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Maria Franklin.

    In the aftermath of the Civil War, a small group of black families founded Antioch Colony in rural Hays County, TX. This enclave of kin-related households rapidly became a beacon for other emancipated blacks who were drawn to the colony’s church and school. The settlement’s growth and stability hinged upon the success of farming households to work together, stay out of debt, and retain their hard-earned land. Archaeological and oral history research focused on the descendants of these pioneering...

  • Archaeological And Archival Investigations Of A Norwegian Farmstead In Bosque County, Texas (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Alexandra M Smith.

    Bosque County, Texas, has a rich history as the most successful Norwegian settlement in the state, attracting immigrants throughout the latter half of the 19th century. Ole Finstad was no exception to this Texas fever; immigrating in 1871 at the age of 51, he acquired 160 acres in Bosque County, built a rock house, and spent his days farming and raising cattle. His descendants continued this tradition for the next 84 years, and the ruins of the original rock house still stand today. This paper...

  • An Archaeological Investigation Of The Submarine Resurgam (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT William Garrett. Peter Holt.

    The early steam powered submarine Resurgam was designed and built by an eccentric curate from Manchester, England, and was lost in mysterious circumstances off North Wales in 1880.  The submarine was relocated in 1995 and was investigated in 1997 by a mixed team of avocational and professional divers, archaeologists and conservators during the SubMap project.  A summary of the results of this and later investigations is presented along with a new analysis of the Resurgam submarine's...

  • Archaeology of Excursion Steamboats: Recent Work on Late 19th Century Shipwrecks of the Midwest (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Mark Schwartz. Mark Gleason. Mary Dersch. Brian Abbott. Mark W Holley.

    Shipwrecks in inland lakes in the United States provide scholars with an opportunity to study the nautical archiotecture and technological design of early excursion steamboats. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, inland lakes were important areas for resort communities, and leisure destinations for urban centers. An important aspect of these spots were steamboats designed exclusively for pleasure excusrions. Recent sonar imaging of the shipwreck Hazel A. in Reeds Lake, Michigan has...

  • An Archaeology of Inventories: An 18th Century Jesuit Winery and Distillery in Nasca, Peru (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Brendan J. M. Weaver.

    Estate inventories offer archaeologists a synchronic assemblage of material culture including the built environment, and an opportunity to understand how aspects of such an assemblage relate to one another and the landscape from the perspective of the assessor. Two such inventories exist for the Hacienda La Ventilla, an annex of the Hacienda San Joseph de La Nasca owned by the Cuzco Jesuits. The first dates to the sale of La Ventilla by a lay proprietor in 1706 and lists the structures,...

  • Archaeology on Rogers Island in the Hudson River (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT David R. Starbuck.

    In the summer of 2017, field work resumed on Rogers Island for the first time in 19 years.  Covered with barracks buildings, huts, tents and hospitals, Rogers Island was the centerpiece of a 16,000-man British military encampment during the French & Indian War.  The current phase of archaeology conducted by SUNY Adirondack and Plymouth State University will assist in the development of walking trails on the island.

  • Archaeology on the World's Oldest Wooden Tugboat: Documenting and Restoring M/V Arthur Foss (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Saxon T Bisbee. Nathaniel F Howe.

    Northwest Seaport Maritime Heritage Center in Seattle is one of the oldest maritime heritage organizations in the US, and its fleet flagship is also one of the oldest of its kind. The historic wooden tugboat Arthur Foss (1889) represents Pacific Northwest wooden shipbuilding at its height, and a long tradition of maritime commerce on the Pacific coast. This vessel, while technically operational, has never had a major restoration or significant documentation of its construction features. No...

  • Archaeology over the Edge: Recent Work on the Hanging Flume in Western Colorado (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Michael J. Prouty.

    In the spring of 2017, Alpine Archaeological Consultants, Inc. (Alpine) completed an inventory and site testing of the Hanging Flume and associated sites in western Montrose County, Colorado.  The Hanging Flume was a 10-mi.-long bracket flume that was suspended along the cliff walls above the San Miguel and Dolores river canyons.  It was constructed between 1889 and 1891 by the Montrose Placer Mining Company in association with a hydraulic gold placer mining operation along the banks of the...

  • The Backyard Shipwreck: The 2017 Lake Champlain Maritime Museum Field School Exploration Of A Shipwreck in Basin Harbor (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Allyson Ropp.

    The 2017 Field School held by the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum explored an unknown wreck lying in Basin Harbor. One of the primary reasons for the start of the museum, the wreck has been known about since the inception of the Basin Harbor Club around the harbor. Yet the identity, time period, and type of vessel still remain unknown. This year's field school aimed to answer some of these questions. Basing the research design on the previous research conducted on site in 1982 and 2016, the field...

  • Balls, Cocks, and Coquettes: The Dissonance of Washington’s Youth (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Laura Galke.

    Powerful messages concerning ideal gender roles are significant, yet latent features of presidential biographies. Most contemporary authors suggest that Washington succeeded despite the efforts of his mother, Mary Ball Washington. Biographers tend to be most offended by Mother Washington when she exercised agency. Archaeological investigations at Washington’s childhood home in Stafford County, Virginia underscore the dissonance between the material culture of his youth and popular narratives...

  • The Battle of KS-520: Results from a survey of a WWII battlefield off North Carolina's coast. (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Joseph C Hoyt.

    When WWII came to the United States, the east coast became part of a massive naval battlefield. Few other areas better represent this activity than the waters off North Carolina. Monitor National Marine Sanctuary has been studying sites in the region associated with the Battle of the Atlantic for nearly ten years.  When convoy KS-520 was attacked by a German u-boat escort vessels sunk U-576 in a counterstrike. As a result, a stricken freighter and the u-boat that sunk it were lost. In 2014 the...

  • Battle of Midway: 2017's Exploration for Sunken Aircraft (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Bert S. Ho. Kelly Gleason Keogh.

    In May of 2017, the NPS' Submerged Resources Center and NOAA's Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument conducted an exploratory survey for sunken aircraft from WWII's Battle of Midway in June of 1942. What was found spanned the centuries of maritime activity at the Atoll including the battle. It also displayed on the seafloor all aspects of the military's long use of the island as a base, and their lasting impact on the island landscape. Today multiple federal agencies manage Midway as a...

  • Be Polite, Be Professional, But Have A Plan To Not Kill Every Shipwreck You Meet: Fusing Traditional Methods, and Cutting-Edge Geospatial Modeling to Adaptively Manage a Maritime Cultural Landscape Under Siege. (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Christopher P. Morris. Kinney Clark.

    In the battle to preserve vulnerable historic maritime resources, recovery efforts after the unprecedented devastation of Superstorm Sandy highlighted a desperate need to locate, identify, and catalog the submerged resources of New Jersey. Today, resiliency undertakings, new development projects, plans to address rising sea levels and severe storms, have all encountered maritime archaeological resources. With over 1,600 known historic shipwrecks crowding only 150 miles of Atlantic coastline, and...

  • Before the Emergence of the Modern World (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Robert Schuyler.

    Historical Archaeology, as properly defined, is the archaeology of the Modern World - plus or minus the last half millennium of human global evolution. Various inception dates have been suggested for the initiation of the processes that produced modernity:1415. 1453, 1481, 1492,1494, 1500, 1550 or even 1946. To fully understand the Modern World and its archaeology, its precursors and roots also need to be recognized. Techological diffusion spheres, interregional trade, continential movements of...

  • The Beginning of the End - An Economic Impact Analysis on Late 19th-Century Charcoal Production in the Roberts Mountains of Eureka County, Nevada (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT S. Joey LaValley.

    During the late 19th-century, mining companies in Eureka, Nevada depended on a steady flow of charcoal to fuel their smelters. This charcoal was produced in the hills and mountain ranges surrounding Eureka by teams of woodcutters, laborers, and charcoal burners also referred to as the Carbonari. As the demand for fuel persisted, land around Eureka was deforested and charcoal production expanded into areas well-away from the smelters. By the mid-1880s the demand for charcoal began decreasing as a...

  • Best Practices for 3D Recordation and Visualization of Historical Archaeological Sites (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Brian Crane.

    The use of 3D recordation and visualization techniques on archaeological sites has expanded dramatically in recent years. In response to the popularity of these technologies, European practitioners have developed the London Charter for the Computer-Based Visualization of Cultural Heritage as a foundation for best practices. This paper discusses the London Charter and how it may be applicable to American Historical Archaeology. Issues include appropriate technology selection, documenting sources...

  • Blood, Sweat and Queers: Roller Derby and Queer Heritage (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Angela A. McComb. Nathan Klembara.

    Queer theory is a new and developing realm of heritage management; with the listing of historic places Stonewall National Monument and the Bayard Rustin Residence, queer heritage is attaining broader recognition. Investigations into the broader patterns of queer history will expose additional spaces and places with important associations to queer communities on multiple levels. Roller derby’s queer-normative environment has become a center of community-building in the last twenty years,...

  • Bricks On Black Water: A Comparative Landscape Analysis of an 1830s Brickyard (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Jess Hendrix.

    As a result of the development of a large U.S. military complex in the newly obtained territory of Florida, Pensacola experienced a historic Brick Boom in the 1830s. The opportunity to profit from brick manufacturing prompted many individuals to establish brickyards along the region's many waterways. The Scott Site is one such site, where excavations have been ongoing since 2008 via a joint-education program between Florida Public Archaeology Network and Milton High School. The resulting...

  • Bridging the Gap Between CRM and Academia: A Potential Model (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Michelle A. Slaughter. Karin Larkin.

    In general, State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPO) designed guidelines and timelines for compliance projects that mitigate cultural resources potentially impacted by proposed development. These purposes are fundamentally different from those of academic work and field schools, which focus on theory based interpretation and field techniques. Yet academic field schools are designed to prepare students for a professional life beyond their undergraduate career and for most that means working in...

  • Bringing Water to the Desert: the Civilian Conservation Corps at Petrified Forest National Park (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT William T Reitze. Melyssa Huston.

    Over the last four years Petrified Forest National Park has begun to replace the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) installed waterline which carries drinking water to the original headquarters complex at Rainbow Forest. At the completion of the project in 1940 the Rainbow Forest Waterline represented the longest CCC hand-dug waterline in a National Park. Survey and recording, currently in progress, along the complete 26 mile corridor has documented a detailed archaeological record of the lives...

  • Brunswick's Bakers: The Archaeological Investigation of a Dwelling and Bake Oven at Lot 35 in Brunswick Town State Historic Site (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Andrew J Holloway.

    During the summer of 2016, students led by Dr. Charles Ewen excavated the proposed Edward Moseley Ruin (now the bake oven at Lot 35) at Brunswick Town State Historic Site. Instead of finding the house and associated buildings of Lot 34, the students uncovered the remains of structure N5 on Lot 35 along with an associated ballast oven. Later analysis of the historical record determined that the property was owned by Christopher and Elizabeth Cains until 1775 and then sold to Prudence McIlhenny....

  • Can You Hear Me Now? Establishing an Archaeological Connection in the World of Telecommunication (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Cori Rich.

    Driven by the desire to learn, explore, and grow in the field of archaeology, those who chase this life are often left asking themselves: to CRM or not to CRM? Cultural Resource Management, specifically Phase I survey, is not what many would consider "exciting" or even "sexy".  All that in mind, I have taken on the task of building and managing a multi-state CRM program built on the foundation of telecommunications projects and Phase I surveys.  Telecom has created a unique environment that...

  • Can You See Me Now?: Exploring Lines Of Sight On A Virginia Plantation (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Erica G Moses. Matthew C. Greer.

    As part of ongoing archaeological investigations of Quarter Site B at Belle Grove Plantation in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, geospatial data from various sources are being compiled and analyzed in ArcGIS. Of particular interest is the spatial relationship between the quarter site and the two main loci of white control over the plantation, the manor house and the plantation office/store. This presentation uses viewshed analysis and 3D visualization to explore visibility and lines of sight within...

  • Castle House Coop: Unmasking an Artist's Space (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Mary Petrich-Guy. Renae J. Campbell.

    Self-taught artist, James Castle, lived his entire life in Idaho (1899-1977). From a young age, he created his works from everyday materials, such as mail, matchboxes, pages of siblings’ homework, and found objects. Castle moved to Boise with his family in the 1930s and while at this farm, he used a converted chicken coop/shed as a private workspace and abode. In October 2016, archaeologists from the University of Idaho (UI) collaborated with the James Castle House, Boise City Department of Arts...

  • A Century of Ceramics: A Study of Household Practice on the Eastern Pequot Reservation (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Kelton Sheridan.

      This project examines foodways and practices related to ceramic use on the Eastern Pequot reservation in North Stonington, Connecticut. Analysis of ceramic assemblages from three sites from different time periods focusing on ware type, vessel form, and decoration has informed how the Eastern Pequot negotiated these markets and utilized ceramics. Engagement with the local Euro-American markets by New England’s Native peoples was necessary during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, but how...

  • Ceramic Spatial Patterning at Paraje San Diego on El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, New Mexico (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Shannon Cowell.

    For travelers on El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, the 1,600 mile trail connecting Mexico City to Santa Fe, the Paraje San Diego (LA 6346) in southern New Mexico is a significant campsite connecting the trail to the Rio Grande before it diverges into the waterless Jornada del Muerto to the north.  Past analysis of ceramics from the site revealed broad patterns in directional trade and chronology of the Camino Real; recent field data, including point-plotted ceramics recovered from the site,...

  • Changing Courses, Changing Fortunes: An Historical And Archaeological Exploration Of A Mississippi River Boomtown (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Meghan Weaver. Virgil Beasley. Hunter B. Johnson. Keith Little.

    The nineteenth-century community of Warrenton, Mississippi, and its fortunes were inextricably linked to the changing courses of the Mississippi River. The town's position, only slightly higher than the river, provided an excellent steamboat landing for the import and export of goods, people, and ideas, but also made the town prone to flooding and disease. During Warrenton's vibrant occupation it was home to prominent residents including CSA President Jefferson Davis, shipped more cotton than...

  • Chebacco: The Boat that Built Essex (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Leland S Crawford.

    Built to save a struggling New England fishing industry, the Chebacco boats were an amalgamation of ship features that rose to prominence after the time American Revolution. This is the boat that gave Chebacco Parish of Masschusettes, the power and influence to become the famous shipbuilding town of Essex. This talk will briefly cover the history and development, the features that make Chebacco boats unique, and finally, we will look at the Coffin's Beach site which shows the example of a...

  • Checking In: An Examination of the Pend d'Oreille Hotel (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Molly E Swords.

    In 1910, people traveling eastward or westward on the Northern Pacific Railroad, would have had an opportunity to get off the train at Sandpoint, Idaho.  These travelers may have been lured in by the promise of jobs in lumber, the picturesque lake with mountains surrounding the town, or the "stories" told about this "party" town.  Whatever their reason for choosing Sandpoint, one of the first businesses to greet them was the Pend d’Oreille Hotel.  Situated adjacent to the railroad tracks it was...

  • Cherokee Community Coalescence in East Tennessee (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Melissa Frederick.

    This paper focuses on ceramics from 40GN9, a Cherokee site in East Tennessee occupied from the 1400s to 1600s, to investigate the issue of coalescence during the Late Mississippian (A.D. 1350-1600) and protohistoric (A.D. 1500-1700) periods, characterized by disease, widespread demographic and environments shifts, and changes in slaving, warfare, and politics. Through quantification of the attributes of wares, forms, and decorations among 40GN9’s ceramics and examination of the spatial...

  • Chronologies of English Ceramic Ware Availability in the 17th-Century Potomac River Valley (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Eric Schweickart. Barbara Heath.

    The mercantile networks that connected England to its North American colonial enclaves in the 17th century were tenuous and often fleeting. At the time, the manufacture and exchange of household goods mostly took place within local or regional networks. Thus, colonial access to objects made in the British Isles depended upon the local or regional networks merchants could access on both sides of the Atlantic Basin. Such mercantile uncertainty complicates the traditional means by which historical...

  • Coal Camps in the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming: Effective Partnering between Archaeologists, State Agencies and Consulting Engineers (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Thomas K. Larson. Dori M. Penny. Marina Tinkcom.

    Wyoming's Abandoned Mine Land Division (AML) has been funding cultural resource investigations at late nineteenth and early twentieth century coal fields in the Rock Springs Uplift since the early 1980s and that work continues up to the present.  A program that began primarily as the closure of dangerous mine openings gradually evolved to address mine subsidence and underground mine fires.  Today, mining-related community impacts and stream erosion problems have become priority issues.  These...

  • Commerce, Cloth and Consumers: Results of Lead Seal Analysis from Three French Colonial Sites in North America (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Cathrine M. Davis.

    Lead seals ("bale seals") remain some of the more mysterious artifacts found at colonial period North American sites, but they have an incredible potential to enrich our understanding of eighteenth-century textile consumption. This presentation will showcase results of the analysis of nearly 300 lead seals from three French colonial sites with different locations, purposes, and inhabitants: Fort St. Joseph, Fort Carillon (Ticonderoga), and Fortress Louisbourg. These varied sites provide a window...

  • Communities of Culture on the Early American Frontier: Investigating the Daniel Baum Family, Carroll County, Indiana (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Christopher R. Moore.

    Daniel and Ascenith Baum arrived in Carroll County, Indiana on a keel boat in April 1825. One of the pioneering families in the region, the Baum residence quickly became a social entrepôt. The first store in the county was opened in one of the Baum cabins, the first courts were held in the Baum house, and travelers coming up the Wabash River regularly stopped at the Baum’s. The Baum farm, then, was a focal point for the development of a community identity for the region’s early settlers. This...

  • Comparative Analysis of the Ceramic Assemblage from the Anniversary Wreck, St. Augustine, Florida (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Samuel P Turner. Chuck Meide. Allyson Ropp.

    The Anniversary Wreck was discovered in 2015, the 450th anniversary of the founding of St. Augustine, Florida. Preliminary analysis of the material recovered dates the site between 1750 and 1800. A closer examination of the ceramic assemblage and a comparison to terrestrial ceramic assemblages from St. Augustine are used to attempt to accurately place the shipwreck within the prevailing historical divisions of Florida’s History that span the years 1750 to 1800, that is, the late First Spanish...

  • Constructing A Community Of Color: A Spatial Analysis Of New Guinea On Nantucket (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Jared P Muehlbauer.

    In 1827, the community of New Guinea on Nantucket, MA opened the doors of the African Meeting House.  The African Meeting House’s construction was a milestone event in the establishment of this thriving community of color.  People of African and Native ancestry on Nantucket coupled this with buying property, building homes, starting businesses, and founding institutions to create a space that allowed them refuge from daily experiences of racism, and facilitated community resistance. By examining...

  • Constructing the Community: A Multi-Scalar Analysis of Runaway Slave Identity in 19th-Century Kenya (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Lydia Wilson Marshall.

    Like Maroons elsewhere in the world, runaway slaves in Kenya were thrown together by circumstance and carried diverse social experiences and cultural practices with them into freedom.  Given this heterogeneity, archaeologists have grown increasingly interested in the mechanisms by which Maroons created communities of broader cultural coherence.  This paper explores the creation of two communities by self-emancipated people in 19th-century Kenya, Koromio and Makoroboi.    Here, I use an expanding...

  • Cooking up Authenticity in an Afro-Brazilian pot: Nationalism, Racism, Tourism, and Consumption of low-fired earthenware ceramics in Pernambuco, Brazil. (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Catherine LaVoy.

    Black beans, smoked sausage, salted beef, the less desirable pig parts, garlic, and onion. These are the basic ingredients of the Brazilian national dish, feijoada. But there is another ingredient, one frequently overlooked, but essential element of the authenticity in the minds of Brazilians. The ceramic pot, holding the magic of the meal’s miscegenation: African, European and Amerindian ingredients blended together in a seemingly innocuous object. Unlike other places in the African Diaspora,...

  • Copper-The Overlooked Artifact Of The Borderlands Of New Spain (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Russell K Skowronek.

    From the littoral of Florida to coastal California vessels made of copper have been regularly found on archaeological sites associated with the borderlands of New Spain.  While described in in the associated archaeological literature they, unlike the ubiquitous copper artifacts associated with sites in New France, have not received systematic analysis.  This presentation, based on nearly two decades of archaeological and documentary research, brings the folk taxonomy found in documents into...

  • Crossroads on the Coast: A Preliminary Examination of Bridgetown, Antigua (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Arik J. K. Bord.

    In 1675, the colonial English government passed a law that established six "trade-towns" on Antigua. The law required that all imports, exports, and intra-island trade be conducted in these towns to be assessed for taxes. Of the original six towns, all but Bridgetown and Bermudian Valley are still extant. The Bridgetown site is located on Willoughby Bay on the south-eastern side of the island.  Local legend states the town was abandoned after a devastating earthquake in 1843, the inhabitants...

  • Culture Embossed: A Study of Wine Bottle Seals (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT E. Breen.

    Over the course of the eighteenth century, consumer goods became widely available to larger segments of the colonial population through the local retail system. As access to an array of goods opened to consumers across the socio-economic spectrum, one way that the colonial gentry distinguished themselves and communicated their social standing and pedigree was through the application of initials, names, crests, and coats of arms to otherwise indistinguishable items of material culture. Recently,...

  • Culture, Class & Consumption: Ireland in the Early Modern Atlantic World (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Rachel Tracey.

    Archaeological investigations throughout the northern Irish port town of Carrickfergus have generated a vast collection of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century material culture, reflecting the role of the town as an entrepôt of early-modern Atlantic goods.  Carrickfergus was a heterogeneous settlement, with a mixture of Gaelic Irish, Scots, and English identities amongst a network of merchants, sailors, soldiers, and tradesmen.  The material culture is illustrative of the changes in attitudes...

  • Current Research on the 1969 Yreka Chinatown Archaeological Excavation and Collection (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Sarah C Heffner.

    In 1969, construction of I-5 through Yreka in northern California, threatened to destroy historic building foundations and archaeological deposits associated with Yreka’s Chinese community.  From January to March 1969, State Parks archaeologists conducted a salvage excavation at the location of what was Yreka’s last Chinatown, occupied from 1886 through the 1940s.  This was one of the earliest excavations of a Chinese community in California. Archaeologists recorded nine features and cataloged...

  • Death by a Thousand Cuts: Souveniring, Salvage and the Long, Sad Demise of HMAS Perth (I) (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Kieran Hosty. James Hunter. Shinatria Adhityatama.

    In May 2017, maritime archaeologists affiliated with the Australian National Maritime Museum (ANMM) and Indonesia’s Pusat Arkeologi Nasional (ARKENAS) conducted a survey and site assessment of HMAS Perth (I), a modified Leander class light cruiser sunk by the Imperial Japanese Navy during the Battle of Sunda Strait in March 1942. When discovered in 1967, Perth’s wreck site was almost completely intact, save for battle damage and subsequent deterioration caused by natural transformative...

  • Defend Your Coast: GIS Network Analysis of Crusader Fortifications Within the Kyrenia Region of Cyprus (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Tyler M Caldwell.

    The rise of the Arabic Caliphates in the Levant and the subsequent dominance of the Mediterranean Sea by their fleets led to large scale construction of fortifications on Cyprus. Alexius I, ruler of the Byzantine Empire, constructed numerous fortifications in the Kyrenia region of Cyprus to secure the natural resources and coastline from Arabic incursions. These fortifications along the mountain ranges and ports acted as lookout positions and walled areas people could retreat to in times of a...

  • Detecting Dutchness: Global Identities in the 17th Century Dutch Atlantic (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Jessica L. Nelson.

    This paper discusses the development of a Dutch national identity in the 17th century Dutch Republic, as evidenced in both the archaeological and historical records, and how this identity persisted with some variation in the West India Company colonies of New Netherland and St. Eustatius. By the early 1600s, a common Dutch identity rooted in the shared values of pragmatism, cleanliness, self-interest, Calvinist morality tempered by an appreciation for material comforts, and a conviction in the...

  • Dining in Detroit: A critical look at urban food consumption patterns through 19th Century Faunal Remains Analysis. (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Jaroslava M Pallas.

    As North American cities underwent growth and change in the early to mid 1800s, production and consumption of food became a chief driving force in this transformation. For many North American cities, including Detroit, a defining moment in urbanization is characterized by the change in food production. Through an assemblage of faunal remains, historical documents, and cookbooks, this paper attempts to illustrate the processes of change in Detroit during 19th century, and observe the transition...

  • Discovering San Antón de Carlos: the Sixteenth Century Spanish Buildings and Fortifications of Mound Key, Capital of the Calusa (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Victor Thompson. Amanda D. Roberts Thompson. William Marquardt. Karen J. Walker. Lee A. Newsom.

    In 1566, Pedro de Menéndez de Aviles arrived at the capital of the Calusa kingdom. During that same year Menéndez issued the order to construct fort San Antón de Carlos, which was occupied until 1569. This fort was also the location of the first Jesuit mission (1567) in what is now the United States. We now can confirm, what archaeologists and historians suspected, that the location of the fort and the capital of the Calusa was the site of Mound Key (8LL2), located in Estero Bay in southwestern...

  • Divergent Paths: Reflections on Section 106 and the Archaeology of Nostalgia (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Thomas E. Emerson. Robert F. Mazrim. Duane E. Esarey.

    For nearly half-a-century Illinois historical archaeologists have been buffeted by changing disciplinary goals, compliance directives, and academic fluxes. Early efforts in the 1920-50s at Lincoln’s New Salem, French Colonial sites, and pioneer sites were classic "handmaidens to history" designed to materialize significant historic events.  The focus shifted dramatically with the NHPA and processualistHistoric emphasis in Criteria D on significance resting solely on material remains.  Given the...

  • Dresden Porcelain Project (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Linda Pomper.

    I am an art historian and I am involved in the Dresden Porcelain Project.  August the Strong (1630-1730) was Elector of Saxony and King of Poland, was the greatest collector of Chinese and Japanese porcelain of this time.  His collection of over 8500 pieces is now being catalogued and put on the web by a team of scholars.  Because the collection was inventoried twice, in 1721 and again later in the 18th century, it is extremely important.  I will show some examples of Kangxi (1662-1722) blue and...

  • The Ekanachattee Trading Post in the Choctawhatchee River (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Ivor R. Mollema.

    In March 2017, we received a call from a local property owner and archaeologist suggesting that they may have located an old Anglo-Native American Trading Post in the eastern edges of Chocctawhatchee Bay in Florida. While this part of the bay had never before been surveyed, the proximity of previously identified sites and historical research suggested that this was a likely location for the maritime end of the Ekanachattee Trading Trail from Florida's British Period. During the following months,...

  • The Emplacement of the First Cathedral or "Iglesia Mayor" in the Capital of New Spain (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Lorena Medina Martínez.

    The transformation and the reuse of the urban landscape of the capital of Mexico Tenochtitlan, by the Spanish in the sixteen century is an event that continues to raise questions as well as provides new data through archaeological interventions around the area that in the past was occupied by the Aztec capital. In 2016, an ongoing archaeological investigation conducted by the Urban Archeology Program (PAU) of the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) uncovered a series of walls,...

  • Enigmatic Toyah: Archaeological and Historical Evidence of Ethnic Diversity on the Southern Plains, 1350-1600 CE (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Crystal A Dozier.

    In 1528, Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca was shipwrecked of what is now Texas and recorded the very first European account of the diverse native peoples of the Southern Plains. I present the evidence from the concurrent archaeological phase, Toyah (1350-1600 CE), arguing that the archaeological record is not granular enough to identify ethnic designations such as Cabeza de Vaca witnessed. Rather, the archaeological record reflects likely social structures in which Cabeza de Vaca traveled—a fluid...

  • An Ethnomicrobiology Case Study from Seventeenth-Century Shipboard Food Made Using Experimental Archaeology (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Grace Tsai. Elizabeth Latham.

    Microorganism have played a vital role in agriculture, medicine, and food production since ancient times. Societies would save, preserve, and inoculate foods and other products with microbes such as yogurt that is fermented with Lactobacillus. Although their existence and mode of action was not understood until the mid-19th century, societies and bacteria have lived symbiotically for millennia. The new field of ethnomicrobiology is defined as the study of the use of microbes, including bacteria,...

  • Evanston Chinatown A Look At Food-ways And Diversity (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT A.Dudley Gardner.

    The Evanston Chinatown was occupied from ca 1870 to 1922.  Evanston is located in extreme southwestern Wyoming, in a valley drained by the Bear River.  Excavations of this Chinatown have revealed a diversity of material cultural remains. Based on our findings n this paper we will present the diverse ways the Chinese immigrants adapted to living in Evanston. We will do this by examining the food ways of Chinese immigrants and looking at the macro and micro floral remains recovered from the site.

  • Exploring Infatigable (1855): First insights from Archaeology into the mid-Nineteenth Century Chilean Navy (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Diego Carabias. Renato Simonetti. Carla Morales.

    Infatigable was a Chilean Navy sailing transport vessel, lost in the harbour of Valparaiso (32° S) in 1855 as a consequence of an accidental explosion and subsequent fire. Positively identified in 2005, the wrecksite designated site S3 PV has been archaeologically investigated comprehensively during the last decade. The underwater survey and excavations conducted recorded the structural remains of the hull and produced a numerous and varied artefact assemblage to be analyzed. The material...

  • Exploring Landscapes of Political Violence through Collaborative Archaeology (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Tiffany C. Cain.

    How does political violence impact civilian spaces and how can we rethink its consequences for everyday life? The Tihosuco Heritage Preservation and Community Development Project has used collaborative archaeology to grapple with the postconflict landscapes of Quintana Roo, Mexico. Our most recent work focuses specifically on an 18th-19th century town, called Tela, whose fortified houselots, roadblocks, and assemblages offer evidence of the early years (1847-1866) of the Caste War or Maya Social...

  • Far From Home: A Proposed Identification of the Winks Wreck, Kitty Hawk, N.C. as the Bristol-Built Steamship Mountaineer (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Lucas Simonds.

    The Winks Wreck, located a short distance offshore of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, represents a unique facet of the underwater cultural heritage of the Outer Banks. Consisting primarily of two side-lever steam engines — typical of early British rather than American-built steamships — the site is unlike most others found in the region. The identification of the site as the wreck of Mountaineer, built in Bristol in 1835, was first suggested by local diver and researcher Marc Corbett in 2012. Diver...

  • Finding HMS Amethyst; A 32-Gun Royal Navy Napoleonic Frigate (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Mallory Haas.

    During the summer of 2014 The SHIPS Project UK located a wreck within Plymouth Sound.  Further investigation during fieldwork in 2015 identified the wreck as the Royal Navy heavy frigate HMS Amethyst lost in 1811. Throughout the 2015 field season a number of artifacts were recovered including a large number of copper fixings and a quantity of copper hull sheathing.  Some of the copper fixings included printed dates and manufacturers marks.  Subsequent research into copper has connected us with...

  • Fishy Business: Investigations At The Fairchild Fish House, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Carrie A. Christman.

    In 2015 and 2017, Commonwealth Heritage Group excavated the Fairichild Fish House, a mid- to late-nineteenth-century family homestead and fishery, within the boundaries of the large pre-contact site 47SB0173 in southeastern Wisconsin.  The site is located on the western shore of Lake Michigan and protected by a large dune. The Fairchild family was part of the first Euro-American settlers in area. They practiced pound net fishing, a historic and lucrative commercial fishing technique in the...

  • Foodways at a Colonial Military Frontier Outpost in Northern New Spain:The Faunal Assemblage from Presidio San Sabá,1757-1772 (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Arlene Fradkin. Tamra Walter.

    An 18th-century colonial settlement, Presidio San Sabá was the largest and, indeed, the most remote military frontier outpost within the Spanish Borderlands of Northern New Spain in Texas. Garrisoned with 100 Spanish soldiers who resided there with their civilian families, the presidio numbered nearly 400 people. Historical records reveal that this resident population lived under adverse conditions, suffering from malnutrition, disease, and chronic shortages of food and other supplies. Analysis...

  • Foodways in a Third Space (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Jean Lammie.

    Located on the remote shores of Tampa Bay, Fort Brooke (1824-1888) represented a complex sphere of interaction among multiple social groups including United States soldiers, Seminoles, maroons, camp followers, and enslaved laborers. This paper explores the utility of third space and hybridity as a means of analyzing faunal remains and the material culture associated with food acquisition and consumption to better understand how identities were essentialized and contested within this space....

  • "For Sale By All Druggists": A Historical and Archaeological Look at Healthcare and Consumerism in Lincoln's Springfield (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Emma Verstraete.

    Decades of archaeological investigation of the Lincoln Home Historic Site in Springfield, Illinois reveal a rich data set that provides a diverse look into the community.  Archival papers of one most successful pharmacies in the town provide detailed correspondence, purchase orders, and business information from approximately 1844-1860.  Examination of available products and consumer purchasing patterns provide insight into how pharmacies and communities kept pace with national and global trends...

  • Forces of Change: The 19th Century U.S. Fur Trade on the Upper Missouri River (and its Mid-20th Century Archaeological Investigations) (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Lotte E Govaerts.

    The Upper Missouri Basin was part of the territory acquired by the United States through the Louisiana Purchase at the beginning of the 19th century. The Missouri River was the main route of transportation into the northwestern part of this new territory. US companies established trade posts along the river where they exchanged manufactured goods from the eastern US and Europe for furs or skins with local populations. For several decades, this was a high-volume business. In order to learn about...

  • Forestalling Liberation: Enslaved Refugees in the Pee Dee Region of South Carolina, 1861-1865. (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Kevin Fogle.

    The well-publicized liberation of Port Royal in late 1861 was a major concern for slaveholders who operated plantations along the coast or near potential military targets. In an attempt to keep their enslaved communities in bondage, many large planters abandoned their plantations and relocated their bondsmen to sparsely populated inland regions far from the probable path of Union forces. The refugeeing of enslaved laborers put entire communities in perilous circumstances tearing apart support...

  • Forks, Knives, and Spoons: Analyzing Unprovenienced Tablewares from Eighteenth Century Spanish Shipwrecks (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Olivia L. Thomas.

    The early eighteenth century saw many changes in the New World Spanish colonies. As Spain's new Bourbon monarch instituted many reforms in Iberia, trade regulations and colonial systems profoundly affected the colonists in the Americas. The seafaring community was a sort of bridge between these two worlds, and thus a place of cultural exchange. Items for trade, or those utilized by crewmembers and passengers, would have reflected various preferences in style, material, and form, that may...

  • From Alcatraz to Standing Rock: Archaeology and Contemporary Native American Protests (1969-Today) (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT April M. Beisaw.

    Since the occupation of Alcatraz by the Indians of All Tribes (1969-1971), Native American and First Nation protests have been well-documented through a variety of media. Unfortunately, many Americans and Canadians lack the background necessary to understand the messages being conveyed. For example, after the National Park Service began including the Alcatraz occupation in their site interpretation, I witnessed visitors discussing how inappropriate it was to celebrate a prison riot. More...

  • From Freetown to the City Up North: Mapping Rural to Urban Migration in Early Twentieth Century Austin, Texas (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Jannie N Scott.

    The mobility patterns of rural black southerners who relocated to southern cities during the early 1900s is an often-overlooked topic in discussions of early twentieth century rural to urban migration. Using geographic information systems (GIS) software to map and analyze census records, city directories, and other historical documents, this paper presents a micro-level case study of the migration and settlement patterns of former residents from Antioch Colony, Texas between the years of 1900...

  • From River to Sea: A Comparative Analysis of Three Rice Plantation Landscapes on the Santee River in South Carolina (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Kendy Altizer.

    A comparative analysis of three plantations along the Santee River, including The Marsh at its delta, Peachtree near mid-river, and Waterhorn in the back river, will be conducted to serve as a case study for understanding how domestic architecture, as well as designed rice culture landscapes, developed within the unique context of the Santee River system. Analyzing architectural and landscape details of these plantations, including the placement of outbuildings and housing for the enslaved in...

  • From Wagons to Wayfaring: Documenting the Historic Trails In and Around Fort Union National Monument (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Megan D. Postemski.

    Trails, paths, and roads comprise the landscape of movement. As these features accumulate in the landscape, they form a palimpsest, attesting to changing modes and patterns of human movement through time. This project examines the historic trail network in and around Fort Union National Monument (FOUNM) in New Mexico. During the nineteenth century, Fort Union served as guardian of the most prominent thoroughfare, the Santa Fe Trail, which channeled people, wagons, livestock, goods, and ideas...

  • From Who’s Afraid to Yo Solo : Results of the University of West Florida’s 2017 Maritime Archaeology Field School's survey for HMS Mentor. (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Andrew Van Slyke.

    The Siege of Pensacola, fought in 1781, was the culmination of Spain's conquest of the British province West Florida during the American Revolutionary War. Associated with this event was the loss of HMS Mentor, formerly, the American-built Who’s Afraid. According to the vessel’s log, the 24-gun sloop of war was sent up "Middle River" to be scuttled and burned as Spanish General Don Bernardo de Gálvez led his troops into Pensacola Bay. Recently uncovered historical documents have led...

  • Geophysical survey of the old church yard (c. 1640-1890s) in Tyrnävä, Northern Ostrobothnia, Finland (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Tiina M. Väre. Kari Moisio. Aki Hakonen. Sanna Lipkin. Mirette Modarress-Sadeghi. Sirpa Niinimäki. Riina Veijo. Heidi Lamminsivu. Titta Kallio-Seppä.

    In the 2017 survey of the old churchyard of Tyrnävä parish ground penetrating radar and magnetometer were utilized to find the foundations of a church that stood on the site from 1664 until arson in 1865. The parish is situated on the coastal region of Northern Ostrobothnia, Finland and its history dates back to the 17th century. The parish’s churchyard used since the 1640s maintained its status as an active cemetery until the 1890s despite the destruction of the church. With time, the precise...

  • A Geospatial and Statistical Analysis of North Carolina’s First World War Naval Battlescape (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Janie R Knutson.

    Although the United States was late to enter into the First World War, the waters of the nation became a battlefield by the summer of 1918. Ships operating along North Carolina’s coast recurrently fell victim to the unrestricted U-boat campaign. This paper presents a historical and archaeological study of compiled records of all vessels, infrastructure, civilians, and combatants lost, damaged, or attacked in war-related incidents. This study employs Geographical Information System (GIS) software...

  • Getting Your ‘Kicks’?: An Investigation of Historic Route 66 in Petrified Forest National Park (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Hunter W Crosby.

    It is nearly impossible to consider the heyday of traditional Americana, waxing nostalgic about the "good old days" of early travel and tourism in the United States, without thinking about Route 66. Sean Scanlan writes that "…memory and history are separate categories of thought—the former a system of retrieval, the latter a discourse on retrieval—and that nostalgia is the sorry cousin of various ways of retrieving a memory". This begs the question— what was Route 66 really like during its glory...

  • Giving Archaeology It’s Space - Digital Public Interpretation at the Josiah Henson Site (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT cassandra michaud.

    Montgomery Parks is conducting on-going excavations at the Josiah Henson site in Montgomery County Maryland, once a plantation where Josiah Henson and more than twenty others were enslaved. The historic main house and surrounding 3 acres are being developed into a museum focused on both Henson’s life and the institution of slavery in the county.  While some archaeological interpretation will be incorporated into traditional exhibit design, much of the data collected from excavation will be made...

  • Global Currents and Local Currents in Northern La Florida: Recent Finds at the Berry Site in Western North Carolina (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Christopher B. Rodning. David G. Moore. Robin A. Beck.

    Spanish exploration and colonization of the American South encompassed a great deal of movement, including the movements of Spanish conquistadors, flows of goods to coastal entrepots and inland along the routes of Spanish entradas, rearrangements of Native American groups within the cultural landscape, and practices of placemaking that created common ground and borders between natives and newcomers.  One site at which to consider these dimensions of the Spanish colonialism in La Florida is the...

  • The Great House and the Old Plate (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Sean Devlin.

    Archaeological interpretations of consumption have long recognized its role in the construction of social identities and in the furtherance of social goals. While much of the historical archaeology of Jamaica, and indeed the Caribbean more broadly, has focused on exploring the consumption choices of enslaved Africans and African descendants, similar studies of archaeologically recovered planter patterns have not received as much attention. Yet, as archaeologies of whiteness are beginning to...

  • Head Tells Tales – The Life and Times of Rodney, a Convict Transport Vessel Wrecked at Kenn Reefs, Coral Sea (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Irini A Malliaros. James Hunter.

    Archival research, in conjunction with data obtained from a collaborative expedition to Kenn Reefs, Australian Coral Sea Territory, undertaken by the Silentworld Foundation and Australian National Maritime Museum, has revealed the likely wreck site of mid-19th century convict transport vessel, Rodney. Over its lifetime Rodney transported hundreds of convicts and government passengers (free settlers) to Australia.  It was one of many privately-owned ships that undertook this work. However, these...

  • Historical Archaeology of American Merchant Families in Ottoman Izmir (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Fahri Dikkaya.

    The western-Anatolian seaport of Izmir (Symrna) emerged as a wealthy, turbulent and international entrepot in the early 17th century in the Ottoman Empire. The flourishing Izmir in the Mediterranean commerce was controlled by Italians, especially Venetians, before Dutch, French and English merchants set up their networks in the early 17th century. After founding English Levant Company in Izmir, English merchants played crucial roles in the trade networks in the Mediterranean. In the early 19th...

  • HM Sloop Boscawen: The Seven Years' War on Lake Champlain (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Daniel E. Bishop. Kevin Crisman.

    During the Seven Years' War, the British and French vied for control over the Champlain Valley and its influential waterway. In an incredible feat of ship construction, in 1759, the sloop Boscawen and its brig counterpart, Duke of Cumberland, were built and launched in less than two months. Boscawen was utilized throughout the remainder of the war and served as a warship and transport vessel. At the end of its career, the sloop was abandoned and later sank in the shallow waters of the...

  • How Did We Get Here?: An Examination of the Development of Florida’s Rule 1A-31 (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Michael D Roy.

    Florida’s current commercial salvage legislation, Rule 1A-31, serves as a way for the state to better work with and regulate the treasure hunting industry by issuing exploration and recovery permits. This paper looks in depth at 1A-31 to explore the development of this legislation as well as compare it to previous related state programs. Additionally, Florida's state legislationg will be compared and related to federal legislation such as the Abondoned Shipwreck Act. This paper will address...

  • How These Pots Can Talk: Relevancy and Purpose of Archaeology in the Slave Wrecks Project. (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Michelle Gray. Meredith Hardy.

    Underneath the well-manicured landscape of Christiansted National Historic Site stood the center of Danish Caribbean commerce, the Danish West India and Guinea Company Warehouse. Through these doors flowed the lifeblood of the Danish colonial experience – sugar and slave. Since 2015, the National Park Service, as partners in the Slave Wrecks Project, has been conducting a community archaeological program that introduces archaeology and heritage management to local students. The goal of this...

  • Hybridized Ceramic Practice and Creolized Communities: the Apalachee After the Missions (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Michelle M Pigott.

    After the violent collapse of Spain’s La Florida mission system in 1704, the Apalachee nation was disrupted by a diaspora that spread people across the Southeast, eventually to settle in small communities among other splintered nations. Navigating a complex cultural borderland created by constant Native American migrations and European power struggles, the displaced Apalachee experienced rapid culture change in the 18th century. Making use of ceramic data from four archaeological sites related...

  • Identifying an Aircraft Wreck From 370m Above (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Megan Lickliter-Mundon. Frank Cantelas. Wendy Coble. Jeremy Kinney. Jennifer F McKinnon. Jeffrey Meyer. Andrew Pietruszka. James R. Pruitt. Hans Van Tilburg.

    American B-29 Superfortress aircraft flew missions against Japan from air bases in the Marianas Islands near the end of WWII. Combat damage or technical failures forced many B-29s into the ocean surrounding Saipan and Tinian, but no losses in deep water were discovered until 2016, when a NOAA exploration cruise investigated sonar targets in the Saipan Channel. Disarticulated wreckage from a B-29 was located at 370m over a large area. Telepresence enabled exploration from NOAA’s ship Okeanos...

  • Identifying Historic Ceramics: Applications of X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry in Archaeology (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Meredith A Stoops.

    While ceramics are prevalent among many historical archaeological excavations, it is often difficult to properly identify ware type, particularly to the archaeologist untrained in ceramic studies.  Even with such training some sherds may still remain unidentifiable.  The purpose of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to accurately categorize ceramic sherds by ware type based on the elemental composition of their glaze.  By analyzing...

  • Identity Formation and Consumption During At The End Of The Colonial Era in El Salvador (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Christopher T. Begley. Roberto Gallardo.

    Recent underwater archaeological research in El Salvador explores identity formation and consumption through an examination of material culture from a mid-19th century steamship wreck. Analyses of  data from a circa 1860 shipwreck with remarkably well-preserved cargo allows insight into the consumption patterns involving both sumptuary and quotidian goods at a moment during  the first decades of the Republic of El Salvador, founded in 1841. This transition from colony to republic saw dramatic,...

  • Impressions, Itineraries And Perceptions of a Coastscape: The Case of Medieval Paphos (12th-16th Century CE) (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Maria Ktori.

    Previous research has established the dynamic relationship between humans and their environment. Based on Westerdahl's seminal theory regarding the maritime landscape, this relationship becomes more intense and complex in a coastal setting. This paper presents the case of Paphos, a harbour town in west Cyprus, during the Lusignan period (1192-1474/89) and the Venetian period (1474/89-1570/71). Travelling literature provides us with impressions, perceptions and the travellers' itineraries from...

  • In Pursuit of Eighteenth-Century Urban Landscapes in the "Old North State:" A Summary and Common Themes of 50+ Years of Urban Archaeology in North Carolina’s Colonial Country-politan Port Towns (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Thomas E. Beaman. Jr..

    Given their historically modest size and meager populations, one could hardly consider the colonial port towns of North Carolina "urban" by period standards when compared to contemporary Philadelphia or Charleston.  Largely due to unique coastal geography, the culturally rural character, and comparatively late development of North Carolina during the colonial era, smaller towns shared common characteristics of design and development that fulfilled regional needs as developed centers, where...

  • Indiana’s Maritime Heritage: Ongoing Investigations and Management Strategies for the 1910 Muskegon (aka Peerless) Shipwreck (12LE0381) (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Samuel I. Haskell. Matthew Maus. Charles D Beeker. Kirsten M. Hawley.

    Built in 1872 as the Peerless, the Muskegon (12LE0381) was a steamship that operated on the Great Lakes until it was abandoned in 1911. Having functioned as a passenger-freighter, a lumber-hooker, and a sand-sucker during its service, the Muskegon represents important innovations in engineering, commerce, transportation, and industry. Following initial documentation by state archaeologist Gary Ellis in 1987, the Muskegon became the first shipwreck in the State of Indiana to be listed in the...

  • Influences of Nineteenth-century Victorian Values on Health Concerns in Parramatta New South Wales (Australia) (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT E. Jeanne Harris.

    This paper presents preliminary findings of doctoral research exploring the influences of Victorian middle-class values on nineteenth-century health concerns. After years of professional research on 19th health-related artefacts within archaeological assemblages, the author noted a reoccurring pattern in the historical literature which promotes the idea of a lack of middle-class values within working-class populations. This research project contests this notion by exploring how these values...

  • Insufferable Conduct: The Slave Overseer in 18th-Century Virginia (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Boyd S. Sipe.

    Historical and archeological literature documenting plantation overseers in the American South is very limited and the extant sources focus almost entirely on overseers from the later antebellum period.  The relevance of such information to colonial-period overseers, who are rarely identified in the archeological record and who left few documentary traces, is unclear. At the Accotink Quarter site (44FX0223) in Fairfax County, Virginia, intact historic features and artifact deposits indicated the...

  • Interpretations of Architectural Remains at Fort St. Joseph (20BE23), Niles, MI (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Erika K Loveland.

    To better understand the built environment of Fort St. Joseph, an eighteenth-century mission, garrison, and trading post located along the St. Joseph River, the architectural remains have been a focus of excavation over the past ten years. The remains discovered through excavation at the fort will be discussed as they offer insights on the layout and size of buildings uncovered as well as the techniques and materials used in the buildings’ construction by the fort occupants. Knowledge gleaned...

  • Investigating the Royal Navy submarine HMS/M A7 lost in Whitsand Bay, Cornwall, in 1914; (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Allen Murray. Mallory Haas.

    In 1914 A7 was on a training run and subsequently began her training dive, she was unable to surface again. Attempts were made to relocate her, but by that time all hands were lost, a total of 11 lives.  The Royal Navy was then unable to recover her, and she was abandoned.  Forgotten till sports divers relocated her in the 1970’s, then in 2001 A7 was designated a Controlled Site, under the Protection of Military Remains Act. Little was known of the wreck site due to a lack of monitoring of its...

  • The Investigation of the Anniversary Wreck, a Colonial Merchant Ship Lost off St. Augustine, Florida: Results of the 2017 Excavation Season (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT Chuck Meide.

    In July 2015, during the city’s 450th anniversary celebration, a buried shipwreck was discovered off St. Augustine, Florida by the St. Augustine Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program, or LAMP. Test excavations in 2015-2016 revealed a remarkable amount of material culture, including barrels, cauldrons, pewter plates, shoe buckles, cut stone, and a variety of glass and ceramics. These tentatively dated the vessel to 1750-1800 and suggested its nationality was likely British but possibly...

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