In Pursuit of Eighteenth-Century Urban Landscapes in the "Old North State:" A Summary and Common Themes of 50+ Years of Urban Archaeology in North Carolina’s Colonial Country-politan Port Towns

Author(s): Thomas E. Beaman. Jr.

Year: 2018

Summary

Given their historically modest size and meager populations, one could hardly consider the colonial port towns of North Carolina "urban" by period standards when compared to contemporary Philadelphia or Charleston.  Largely due to unique coastal geography, the culturally rural character, and comparatively late development of North Carolina during the colonial era, smaller towns shared common characteristics of design and development that fulfilled regional needs as developed centers, where material goods could be obtained and services rendered.  It was not until the early 19th century when their essential function as ports diminished, and these towns ceased expansion as urban growth moved to inland centers.  Today, many of these towns self identify as historic towns and benefit from heritage tourism.  This presentation will explore the commonalities of 50+ years of urban archaeology in North Carolina’s historic port towns. 

Cite this Record

In Pursuit of Eighteenth-Century Urban Landscapes in the "Old North State:" A Summary and Common Themes of 50+ Years of Urban Archaeology in North Carolina’s Colonial Country-politan Port Towns. Thomas E. Beaman. Jr.. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441443)

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Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): Society for Historical Archaeology

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 450