Coal Camps in the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming: Effective Partnering between Archaeologists, State Agencies and Consulting Engineers

Summary

Wyoming's Abandoned Mine Land Division (AML) has been funding cultural resource investigations at late nineteenth and early twentieth century coal fields in the Rock Springs Uplift since the early 1980s and that work continues up to the present.  A program that began primarily as the closure of dangerous mine openings gradually evolved to address mine subsidence and underground mine fires.  Today, mining-related community impacts and stream erosion problems have become priority issues.  These later changes have significantly enlarged the size and scope of reclamation projects to the point that the primary focus of archaeological investigation, and potential impacts, has expanded from mine workings to the mine camps.  This paper examines changes in complexity and approach from both research and preservation standpoints.

Cite this Record

Coal Camps in the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming: Effective Partnering between Archaeologists, State Agencies and Consulting Engineers. Thomas K. Larson, Dori M. Penny, Marina Tinkcom. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441544)

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): Society for Historical Archaeology

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 238