Repatriation (Other Keyword)

1-25 (27 Records)

The Appropriation of Native American Cultural Property: Comparing the U.S. and French Contexts (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michelle I. Turner.

When Native American sacred objects were recently auctioned off as art in Paris, many Americans were shocked by the headlines. American institutions and archaeologists continue to face their own histories of appropriation of Native American culture and objects, but many in the U.S. still seem surprised by the extent to which European institutions resist calls for more sensitive handling of cultural property. Others see a disparity between a widespread acknowledgement of the need to repatriate...


Archaeological Repositories in British Columbia (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Genevieve Hill.

This paper will begin examining the historical context for the development of archaeological repositories in BC, and the changing role they have played. Commercial archaeologists have, of late, regarded repositories in British Columbia as an afterthought, though this was not always the case. A review of the original stakeholders, and goals of archaeological bodies in BC's past will shed light on where we find ourselves and where we should be headed. The second half of the paper will examine...


The articulation of the dead; understanding expatriation, materiality and voice in the process of repatriation. (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dorothy Lippert.

This is an abstract from the "The Future of Bioarchaeology in Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Bioarchaeologists assert the responsibility to give voice to the dead, but the dead exist in many different definitions. As ancestors, they are part of an existing human community, as objects, they are part of a created community of collections. They can also be sources of data for researchers seeking to expand knowledge about human existence....


Beyond Repatriation at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Eric Hollinger.

Congress intended federal repatriation legislation to go beyond removing collections from museums. They hoped that it would lead to new relationships between Native Americans and museums that would recognize the interests of all parties. The Anthropology Department of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History has worked, through its Repatriation Office and other programs, to collaborate with tribes and Alaskan Natives on projects that go beyond repatriation to include initiatives with...


A Brief and True History of SAA's Involvement with NAGPRA (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Vincas Steponaitis. Lynne Goldstein. Keith Kintigh. William Lovis.

SAA was heavily involved in NAGPRA's passage, and played a key role in shaping the compromises embodied in this law. The Society's positions with respect to the many repatriation bills considered by Congress were conditioned by SAA's "Statement Concerning the Treatment of Human Remains," a policy adopted in 1986. SAA strongly and actively supported the final bill precisely because it conformed closely, albeit not perfectly, to the principles articulated in this statement. The policy was also...


Complex Journeys: The Repatriation Experience and Tribal-Museum Relations (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Susan Benton.

Tribes and museums have experienced a paradigm shift in their relationships during the twenty-five years of the NAGPRA era. The experiences of each group have been multi-faceted and complex, driven by new legal mandates and opportunities and shaped by differing viewpoints as to what must, should, and could emerge from the repatriation journey. This paper will explore some of the assumptions, experiences, and future expectations that NAGPRA has engendered in various tribal and museum...


Complying with NAGPRA at the Largest Public Utility: It’s Complicated (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Thomas Maher.

The Tennessee Valley Authority has control of approximately 8,000 human remains and 100,000 funerary objects stored in multiple major research Universities in the southeastern United States. It also manages 293,000 acres of land with 11,000 known archaeological sites. The successes, pitfalls and unexpected discoveries resulting from complying with NAGPRA over the last six years are evaluated in light of the future of prehistoric archaeology in the southeast U.S.


Consultation and Beyond: NAGPRA as a Gateway to Collaboration (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Adam Watson. Jim Enote. Nell Murphy.

With NAGPRA’s passage 25 years ago, many saw this federal mandate as an opportunity for museum professionals, scientists, and Native Americans to assess and change the dynamics of their relationships. Few however, likely anticipated the full range of collaborations between Native communities and institutions that emerged from NAGPRA consultations. One such example is the ongoing partnership between the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) and the A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center in...


Disputing the Dead: U.S. Law on Aboriginal Remains and Grave Goods (1991)
DOCUMENT Citation Only H. Marcus III Price.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Finding Skeletons in Our Closets: Legacy Collections and Repatriation. (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chelsea Meloche.

Contemporary standards of collections management ensure that materials collected during archaeological fieldwork are well-documented, provenienced, and catalogued within a database for future research purposes. These standards have come to be crucial to contemporary archaeological practice, however, this was not always the case. Historically, certain objects were often considered more important than a collection as a whole. This resulted in poorly documented collections, with mis-cataloged,...


Gazing at the Horizon: The NAGPRA Stories Yet to be Told (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lauren Sieg.

What will NAGPRA look like in 25 or 50 years? The horizon is constantly shifting; it looks bright and dark, clear and complicated. Social research on the first generation of archaeologists to emerge after the passage of NAGPRA suggests that NAGPRA will remain relevant and important. At the same time, the increased diversity of this generation and an emerging post-racial world will challenge the concept of identity that lies at the heart of NAGPRA. Digital technologies will provide new methods...


Historical and Archaeological Perspectives On the World War II Prisoner of War Camp at Fort Carson, Colorado (1990)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel A. Jepson.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Keepers of the Treasures Protecting Historic Properties and Cultural Traditions on Indian Lands (1990)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patricia L. Parker. David M. Banks.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Learning by Example: Exploring the Importance of Case Studies in Learning NAGPRA (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jayne-Leigh Thomas. Larry Zimmerman. Felipe Estudillo Colon. Jeffrey Bendremer. Jennifer Meta Robinson.

Although the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) has existed for over a generation, educators and professionals continue to discuss the best ways to prepare learners for the complex and contextually specific process of repatriation. Every consultation and every repatriation differs, even when the same tribes and institutions are involved. Because of this, learners can benefit from seeing multiple examples of how NAGPRA is implemented and how different stakeholders...


Learning NAGPRA and Teaching Archaeology (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jayne-Leigh Thomas. April Sievert. Teresa Nichols. Anne Pyburn.

In 2014 and 2015, researchers from Indiana University received National Science Foundation funding through their Cultivating Cultures of Ethical STEM initiative to study how repatriation is taught and learned, and to work toward interventions to improve the resources available. The “Learning NAGPRA” project prioritizes a more thorough understanding of the challenges and bottlenecks in preparing professionals for work related to NAGPRA and repatriation. It also seeks better ways to assist...


Learning NAGPRA: Nationwide Survey Results (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Teresa Nichols. April Sievert. Jayne-Leigh Thomas. Anne Pyburn.

Although the Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) was passed as federal legislation in 1990, it seems that many students do not receive comprehensive coverage of the law and its connections to the broader disciplinary histories of anthropology and museum studies and to professional research ethics. Indiana University was awarded NSF grants in 2014 and 2015 to conduct a nationwide study on NAGPRA teaching and training and to collaborate with specialists in preparing...


Patriation: NAGPRA’s Regulations on Culturally Unidentifiable Human Remains, applied (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jordan Jacobs.

In 2010, the promulgation of new regulations under 1990’s Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) threatened to upset the hard-won balance that had developed between the legitimate interests of descendant communities and the scientific and museum communities over the previous twenty years. Because the 10.11 rule broadly mandates the disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains, many parties—including the Society for American Archaeology—reacted negatively,...


Reforming the Collection: Documentation, Fieldwork, and the NAGPRA Process at SUNY Oswego (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas Pippin.

The discovery of human remains in the SUNY Oswego archaeological collection in 2005 led to a ten year inventory process to fulfill our responsibilities under NAGPRA. From the beginning, our fundamental difficulty was the overall lack of documentation and information about the materials comprising the Oswego collection. Difficulties with the existing catalog and storage condition of the materials heightened the difficulties of inventory process. Many of the sites represented in our collection...


Repatriation Collaborations Using 3D Technology: The Smithsonian-Tlingit Experience (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Eric Hollinger. Edwell John Jr.. Robert Starbard.

Smithsonian repatriation efforts have resulted in close consultation and collaboration with tribes and Alaskan Native communities that have enabled exploration of museum resources and shared interests taking the communities and the Institution far beyond what was envisioned by most when the repatriation legislation was first enacted. In particular, the Tlingit Dakhl'aweidi clan and the Hoonah Indian Association have worked with the National Museum of Natural History to pilot collaborations using...


The Repatriation of Artifacts to Storm, an 18th Century Shipwreck (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Molly L Trivelpiece.

In today’s archaeological environment full excavation is almost impossible due to a lack of funding. In order to gain a broad picture of a wreck, the archaeologists at the St Augustine Lighthouse and Maritime Museum collect a wide sample of field specimens, not knowing what artifacts may lay inside the concretions. It isn’t until after the concretions have been x-rayed that conservators can determine which concretions may contain the most useful diagnostic information and start the conservation...


Repatriation of the Ancient One - A Tribal View: Then, Now, and In-Between (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jacqueline Cook.

The Ancient One’s 8,400 year old remains were claimed by Native American Tribes as their ancestor after eroding from the banks of the Columbia River in 1996. What began as an Inadvertent Discovery, defined in the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), turned into a 20 year challenge to the Act, tribal culture, oral traditions and religious beliefs. In 2004, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court ruling allowing scientific study of the Ancient One; the...


Repatriation to Lineal Descendants of Sitting Bull (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only William Billeck.

Despite numerous books and historical accounts of the 1890 death of Sitting Bull, only one obscure 1893 magazine article mentions that a U.S. Army surgeon cut off a lock of Sitting Bull’s hair and took leggings from his body. These items were loaned to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History back in 1896 and were recently evaluated for repatriation and were returned to Sitting Bull’s family. This poster reviews the research that determined which descendants had the highest standing...


Results of the 2015 Repatriation Survey (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elise Alonzi.

In 2015, the Society for American Archaeology conducted a survey on members’ opinions on repatriation and the SAA’s Statement Concerning the Treatment of Human Remains. Among other things, this survey was intended to gauge support for changing the SAA’s statement to privilege the wishes of Native American communities, to emphasize scientific values, or to more strongly recognize interests of multiple stakeholders. The majority of the 1,905 respondents to the survey believe that the SAA’s...


Return of Cultural Treasures (1989)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jeanette Greenfield.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Seeking Balance: The Role of the Review Committee in NAGPRA Implementation (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Martha Graham.

As part of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), Congress established the NAGPRA Review Committee, and gave it formal responsibilities covering various critical aspects of NAGPRA's implementations. In establishing Review Committee, Congress sought to "ensure a balance between differing viewpoints among Native Americans, museums, and scientific organizations." This paper considers the Review Committee's involvement in NAGPRA and the important roles that the Society...