Seventeenth Century (Temporal Keyword)

1-17 (17 Records)

Agriculture As Impetus For Culture Contact In Carolina During The 1670s (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Agha.

The first colonists who arrived at Charles Towne in 1670 came with new tropical cultivars and familiar, Old World crops, as well as explicit planting instructions from the Lords Proprietors—mainly Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper, the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury. Shaftesbury was himself an avid British planter and asserted that planting, and nothing else, created colonies. His first plantation in Carolina did not produce the crops he desired, and in 1674, he founded a new, much larger estate farm. This...


Apalachicola Ecosystems Project Fauna
PROJECT Thomas Foster. Roger Brown. National Science Foundation.

This project presents the results of zooarchaeological analysis of faunal specimens recovered from two sites (1RU18 and 1RU27) excavated as part of a multidisciplinary NSF-funded Collaborative Research Project titled the “Apalachicola Ecosystems Project”, as well as a reanalysis of a zooarchaeological assemblage from the nearby site of Spanish Fort. The Apalachicola Ecosystems Project was co-directed by Thomas Foster, Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman, and Roger Brown. The objectives of the...


Archaeological Data Recovery Investigation of the Shade Tree Tract (38CH2048), Johns Island, Charleston County, South Carolina (2018)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Jana Futch. Carolyn Rock. Meagan Brady. C Partridge. Charles F. Philips. C.S. Butler.

The data recovery investigations at 38CH2048 detail a large sample of post-contact material recovered from the site, as well as hundreds of identified cultural features. The long occupation span of the site, from the eighteenth to the twentieth century, combined with the activities of generations of occupants has resulted in mixed contexts. While these mixed contexts obscure straightforward interpretations, the data recovered and analyzed during this Phase III project has contributed to our...


The Artifact Assemblage of the Warwick (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Joshua T. Harden.

This paper is a preliminary analysis of the artifacts recovered from the Warwick shipwreck. Over the course of three field seasons from 2010 to 2012, numerous artifacts were recovered from the site. Artifact types will be described briefly and a historical context given. Basic groups will be created to categorize the artifacts and will include cargo, armament, and rigging. Statistics will be compiled for each category and for individual artifact types within the groups. The ultimate goal is to...


Comales and Colonialism - Identifying Colonial Inequality through a Spatial Analysis of Foodways on a Seventeenth Century New Mexican Spanish Estancia. (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Adam C Brinkman.

During the late sixteenth and seventeenth century colonization of New Mexico by Spanish colonists and indigenous Mexican auxiliaries, rural ranches or estancias, were established in close proximity to autonomous Pueblo villages along the Rio Grande. These estancias were the setting for complex negotiations of colonial power structures which were based upon the exploitation of labor from indigenous peoples. At LA-20,000, an early colonial estancia located off a branch of El Camino Real near Santa...


Edward Rhodes – His Booke: Examining trade routes, functions and vessel performance through primary source documents (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Scott A. Tucker.

Edward Rhodes was a seventeenth-century sailor involved in the English-Chesapeake tobacco trade. Little is known of his life, aside from a single, but extremely detailed document housed in the Bodleian library in Oxford. From 1670-1676, he kept a book describing his journeys back and forth across the Atlantic in four different ships, keeping information on daily positions and weather, but also functional aspects of trade, deaths aboard the ship, and other information as he saw fit. Daily...


An Examination Of Sanitation And Hygiene Habit Artifacts Found aboard Vasa: Health, Sanitation, and Life At Sea In Seventeenth-Century Sweden (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Nathaniel R King.

Vasa was a 64-gun Swedish warship in the service of King Gustav II Adolf .  The vessel sank on its maiden voyage in 1628, taking at least 16 of the approximately 150 persons on board to the depths of Stockholm Harbor (Vasamuseet 2013; Vasa I 2006:36-55).  Amongst the cannon, figureheads, and skeletons are a collection of artifacts that can tell us how the crew lived, not just while aboard Vasa, but also ashore.  These artifacts include chamber pots, glass bottles, and other assorted health and...


Faunal Data from Apalachicola (1RU18, 1RU27) (2014)
DATASET Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman. Andrew Webster.

An Excel spreadsheet containing the zooarchaeological data from Apalachicola (1RU18 & 1RU27), part of the Apalachicola Ecosystems Project. The first tab contains the primary zooarchaeological data, the second tab contains the weights, and the third tab contains a pivot table which shows the total combined weight for each taxon identification.


Faunal Data from Spanish Fort (1RU101) (2014)
DATASET Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman. Nicole Mathwich. Andrew Webster.

An Excel spreadsheet containing the zooarchaeological data from Spanish Fort (1RU101), part of the Apalachicola Ecosystems Project. The first tab contains the primary zooarchaeological data, the second tab contains the weights.


Faunal Remains from the Apalachicola Ecosystems Project (2014)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Chance H. Copperstone. Tracie Mayfield. Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman.

This report presents the results of zooarchaeological analysis of faunal specimens recovered from two sites (1RU18 and 1RU27) excavated as part of a multidisciplinary NSF-funded Collaborative Research Project titled the “Apalachicola Ecosystems Project”, as well a reanalysis of a zooarchaeological assemblage from the nearby site of Spanish Fort. Report prepared for the National Science Foundation (Award # BCS-1026308).


La Belle: The Archaeology of a Seventeenth-Century Ship of New World Colonization (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jim Bruseth.

La Belle was a ship used by the seventeenth-century French explorer Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle in his effort to establish a French colony along the northern Gulf of Mexico.  Ultimately La Belle wrecked along today’s Texas Gulf Coast in 1686.  The wreck was discovered in 1995 and resulted in a multi-year year program of excavation, conservation, interpretation, reporting, and exhibition. This paper will present the results of all these phases of  analysis and reporting by summarizing the...


Masculine Mis/apprehensions: Race, Place, and Gender at Harvard’s Colonial Indian College (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christina Hodge.

This paper considers intersecting identities of gender, race, religion, age, and status in early America, centering on the colonial Harvard Indian College—a highly charged masculine setting in the 17th-century Massachusetts Bay Colony. Institutional structures and the material culture of daily life constrained masculinity for Native American and English members of the early Harvard community while establishing education as a trope of patriarchal power. Young men adopted intensely religious lives...


Negotiating Changing Chesapeake Identities:  Indigenous Women’s Influence on the Transformation of Seventeenth-Century English Immigrant Culture in Maryland (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Valerie M. J. Hall.

Documentary evidence indicates English colonists in seventeenth-century Maryland were trading for/purchasing native-made pottery for use in their daily routines.  I undertook a subtypological analysis of historic-period indigenous ceramics which demonstrated changes occurred in pottery treatments throughout the century.  While exterior attributes showed a trend towards smoother surfaces and thinner walls, echoing European-made ceramics, interior attributes maintained cultural traditions.  This...


Seventeenth Century Battlefields in Colonial New England (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kevin A. McBride.

The National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program has provided funding to research and document several battlefields associated with the Pequot War (1636-1637) and King Philip's War (1675-1676) in southern New England. These battlefield surveys have yielded hundreds of battle-related objects including weapons, projectiles, equipment, and personal items associated with the Colonial and Native American combatants. These battlefield surveys have also provided significant information...


Shade Tree
PROJECT Uploaded by: Ralph Bailey

Archaeological investigations associated with the Shade Tree Tract, also known as Cane Slash Plantation on Johns Island, Charleston County, South Carolina.


The Swedish Sailor’s Table (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stephanie Gandulla.

With the raising of the Vasa came thousands of artifacts, including various examples of treenware, or wooden tableware. From the collection it is clear: although the sailors aboard did not actually have time to eat a meal on that fateful first cruise, they were indeed equipped to do so.  There are 174 artifacts in Vasa’s treenware collection, that represent at least 27 different styles in both carved and turned woodcraft technology. This paper offers a detailed description and accounting of each...


"Whereon ye Ould Foart Stood…:" Geophysical and archaeological investigations at the site of Fort Casimir, New Castle, Delaware (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Wade Catts. Peter Leach. Craig Lukezic.

Fort Casimir, also known as Fort Trefaldighet, was a seventeenth-century fortification situated along the Delaware River. The fort changed hands four times in its short career – built by the Dutch in 1651, captured by the Swedes in 1654, retaken by the Dutch in 1655, and finally seized by the English in 1664. Serving as a focal point of early colonial settlement in the Delaware River valley, its precise location remains both elusive and intriguing to Delaware archeologists. The first attempt to...