Quivira Revisited

Part of: Society for American Archaeology 84th Annual Meeting, Albuquerque, NM (2019)

This collection contains the abstracts of the papers presented in the session entitled "Quivira Revisited," at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology.

In early Spanish accounts, Quivira was the name of a fabulous place far out on the Great Plains. Visited by the Coronado, Humaña, and Oñate expeditions between 1541 and 1601, it became associated with myths of gold and walled cities. In the 20th century, the archaeological remains were identified as the Great Bend Aspect, clusters of supposed village sites in central Kansas. This symposium presents a combination of remote sensing and laboratory science that has revolutionized our understanding of the archaeological remains. Rather than clusters of villages, the communities consisted of huge towns with a well-developed export industry. The remains include ceremonial structures and ground figures that had ritual significance.

Resources Inside This Collection (Viewing 1-4 of 4)

  • Documents (4)

Documents
  • Mapping Lithic Surface Scatters with Drones (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Meredith Mahoney.

    This is an abstract from the "Quivira Revisited" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Combining traditional archaeological methods such as pedestrian survey with unmanned aerial vehicle (drone) mapping creates an opportunity for efficient data capture and analysis of the scale and spatial arrangement of archaeological sites. This poster presents a cost-effective approach to surveying and mapping surface scatters and illustrates how the application of...

  • Quivira in a New Light (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Donald Blakeslee. Steve De Vore.

    This is an abstract from the "Quivira Revisited" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The identification of the "great settlement" visited by Juan de Oñate in 1601 has led to a wholesale revision of our understanding of protohistoric archaeology in Kansas. Instead of clusters of villages, the habitation sites of the Great Bend Aspect are large towns that contained thousands of residents. Sites of this scale require the use of remote sensing...

  • Taking the Lab to the Field: Examinations at Etzanoa, Kansas (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only R. A. Varney. Linda Scott Cummings.

    This is an abstract from the "Quivira Revisited" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Taking scientific lab analyses into the field requires special equipment and planning. PaleoResearch arrived with our mobile field lab to support the archaeological field work. Remote analysis of pollen, phytoliths, seeds, charcoal, and protein residues all are possible, as are the more commonly employed portable XRF and even FTIR analyses. Protein residue analysis...

  • Testing Geophysical Anomalies Using In Situ Shallow Subsurface Spectroscopy and Soil Magnetic Susceptibility Analysis (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only David Maki. Timothy Matney. David Perry. Linda Barrett. Lopa Afrin.

    This is an abstract from the "Quivira Revisited" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. In 2015 the National Park Service’s Archaeological Prospection Workshop was held at the Tobias Site (14RC8). Students and instructors evaluated the site using a variety of non-invasive prospection methods ranging from landscape-level LiDAR analysis to high sample density subsurface geophysical survey. The evaluation identified buried features and patterning within the...