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Archeological Survey: Methods and Uses

Author(s): Thomas F. King

Year: 1978

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Summary

To non-archeologists, one of the deeper "mysteries" of the historic preservation program seems to concern the methods of identification and assessment of archeological properties and utilization of this information in project planning and compliance processes. Misunderstanding and misinformation about these activities are very common. To clarify some of these questions, Dr. Thomas F. King prepared a manual on the methods and objectives of archeological survey that would in large part be addressed to non-archeologists so that they might gain a greater understanding of the nature of archeological resources. Particularly valuable in Dr. King's discussion is his description of the formation of the

archeological record in a hypothetical locality, and then, how this record might have come to be known to archeologists today through various kinds of survey efforts. This is an excellent description of how the archeological record actually has become known in many areas of the United States. Through this means, the reader should gain an understanding of what "existing survey data" enable us to conclude; or, better stated, what they do not permit us to conclude about the

archeological resources of an area.


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Cite this Record

Archeological Survey: Methods and Uses. Thomas F. King. 1978 ( tDAR id: 337789) ; doi:10.6067/XCV8RR1WX8


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -109.067; min lat: 36.992 ; max long: -102.041; max lat: 41.003 ;

Record Identifiers

NADB document id number(s): 626811

NADB citation id number(s): 000000354964

Notes

General Note: Contract number: 930. 1 K, 1 (R)


File Information

  Name Size Creation Date Date Uploaded Access
u-s-dept-of-interior--the-archeological-survey--methods-and-us... 129.46mb Nov 2, 2011 12:28:19 PM Public
Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America