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MACROFLORAL, POLLEN, PHYTOLlTH, AND PROTEIN RESIDUE ANALYSIS OF MATERIAL FROM FRANKTOWN CAVE, SITE 5DA272, COLORADO

Author(s): Kathryn Puseman ; Linda Scott Cummings

Year: 2006

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Summary

Franktown Cave is a large rockshelter in Douglas County, Colorado, that experienced

multiple occupations from at least the Middle Archaic through the Protohistoric periods. A large

amount of material has been collected in the cave from five separate excavations dating to the

1940s, 1950s, and 1976 including chipped stone artifacts; ground stone; potsherds; perishable

artifacts such as fiber, hide, bone, and wood; and ecofacts such as com, other plant remains,

animal bone, shell, and wood. A portion of the perishable artifacts and ecofacts were submitted

to Paleo Research Institute for identification, including wood, charcoal, botanic remains, basket

fragments, sandal fragments, and others. Some of these remains were digested with bleach to

liberate phytoliths and calcium oxalate crystals to aid in identification. Five manos

(groundstone) were washed for pollen to determine plants processed using these tools. Pieces

of hide were subjected to protein residue analysis and hairs, where present, were identified.


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Cite this Record

MACROFLORAL, POLLEN, PHYTOLlTH, AND PROTEIN RESIDUE ANALYSIS OF MATERIAL FROM FRANKTOWN CAVE, SITE 5DA272, COLORADO. Kathryn Puseman, Linda Scott Cummings. 2006 ( tDAR id: 379395) ; doi:10.6067/XCV8057FC1


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File Information

  Name Size Creation Date Date Uploaded Access
06-48.pdf 2.82mb Dec 17, 2012 11:27:46 AM Public
Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America