An Overview of the Human Remains from La Villa: Mortuary Programs, Paleopathology, and Possible Ritualized Use

Summary

La Villa is a Phoenix Basin Hohokam site situated along Canal System 2 with continued occupation from the late Pioneer to the early Sedentary Period, or approximately 500 years. Since 1994, there have been six archaeological projects at the site that have recovered the range of mortuary features expected for that extent of time; 107 cremations, 14 inhumations, and hundreds of instances of isolated bone. The large number of burials therefore provides the opportunity to examine various aspects of both the mortuary practices at La Villa and the biology of its inhabitants. A summary of the burials from all projects is presented along with discussions on proposed interpretations of the cremation rite and the significance of several secondary inhumations and pithouse floor interments to possible social conflict at the site, especially in relation to a painted human infant cranial fragment recovered in the early 1990s. Also important several paleopathological conditions observed in the human remains recovered from La Villa including cranial neoplasms, sinusitis, long bone fractures and dental conditions. Of special note is a secondary cremation of an infant with an unusual type of human figurine fragment accompaniment. The figure has some potential significance regarding the presence of cherubism among the Hohokam,

Cite this Record

An Overview of the Human Remains from La Villa: Mortuary Programs, Paleopathology, and Possible Ritualized Use. T. Michael Fink, Lorrie Lincoln-Babb, Korri Dee Turner. Presented at Southwest Symposium, Tucson, AZ. 2016 ( tDAR id: 401250) ; doi:10.6067/XCV88917GP

Keywords

File Information

  Name Size Creation Date Date Uploaded Access
Southwest-Symposium-2016-La-Villa-poster.pdf 3.76mb Jan 28, 2016 Jan 28, 2016 7:23:10 AM Public
Hohokam bioarchaeology