The Subculture of the U.S.Army during WWII and Its Impact on the Construction of a New Airbase in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska

Author(s): Christopher Roe

Year: 2013

Summary

This presentation reviews my MA thesis which examined how the subculture of a military organization can influence the construction of a new facility. During World War II, the U.S. Army had an upper class of commissioned officers who had access to many resources and a lower class of enlisted personnel who had limited resources. The U.S. Army also segregated African American and female soldiers, each group being restricted in unit assignment, work done, and separation from other white or male soldiers. This thesis analyzed maps of the airbase, Fort Glenn, as it was constructed on Umnak Island in the Aleutian Islands during World War II.  The analysis demonstrated that the Army’s hierarchy and segregation were reflected in the manner in which the Army constructed and located separate buildings for use by officer, enlisted, and female personnel.

Cite this Record

The Subculture of the U.S.Army during WWII and Its Impact on the Construction of a New Airbase in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. Christopher Roe. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428271)

Keywords

Temporal Keywords
1940-1945

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 314