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ETHNOBOTANICAL TRACES AND DOMESTIC SPACES: INVESTIGATIONS OF A CONTACT-ERA FARMSTEAD IN THE COLONIAL SOUTHEAST.

Author(s): Walter A. Clifford IV

Year: 2013

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Summary

The Daniel Island site is a small-scale, multi-component settlement located northwest of Charleston, South Carolina. The contact-era occupation at Daniel Island consists of an Ashley phase farmstead with historical references tying the land to the Etiwan Indians. Cultural resource investigations indicated the presence of early Ashley phase (A.D. 1590-1620) and Late Ashley phase (A.D. 1620-1670) occupations ending prior to the founding of nearby Charles Towne in 1670. I investigate the absorption of Old World crops into Native American subsistence regimes. Existing literature dealing with botanical studies typically highlight botanical remains prior to or post contact. The Daniel Island site provides a fine-scaled point of analysis for viewing changes in quotidian subsistence patterns and how the incorporation of Old World crops influenced Native Americans at this site. The incorporation of Old World crops speaks to cultural processes and interactions, be they localized or diasporic, between Native communities and Europeans.


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Cite this Record

ETHNOBOTANICAL TRACES AND DOMESTIC SPACES: INVESTIGATIONS OF A CONTACT-ERA FARMSTEAD IN THE COLONIAL SOUTHEAST.. Walter A. Clifford IV. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428518)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
CONTACT


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 666

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America