Stagville within, beyond, and through the Digital Archaeological Archive for Comparative Slavery: Comparison -> Transition / Juxtaposition

Author(s): Anna Agbe-Davies

Year: 2015

Summary

The "Slave Cabin" at Stagville, excavated in 1979, was a component of the home farm quarter on one of the largest plantations in North Carolina.  The small structure has several qualities that prompted its inclusion in the Digital Archaeological Archive for Comparative Slavery.  As the first site from the state in the database, it will allow researchers to isolate and identify patterns associated with local conditions, including topography, settlement history, and regional economy.  Stagville as a whole—and this dwelling in particular—also presents an important opportunity to examine the transition to Emancipation and beyond.  Finally, an extensive archival collection of family papers offers a complimentary perspective to the archaeological record, permitting analyses of the strategies for keeping body and soul together in the shadow of the "big house."

Cite this Record

Stagville within, beyond, and through the Digital Archaeological Archive for Comparative Slavery: Comparison -> Transition / Juxtaposition. Anna Agbe-Davies. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 433723)

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Keywords

Temporal Keywords
19th Century

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 265