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Dipt, Painted, and Printed Wares: Ceramic Assemblages from Enslaved Homes as Evidence of Personal Choice at James Madison's Montpelier

Author(s): Kimberly A Trickett

Year: 2015

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Summary

For the past four years the Montpelier Archaeology Department has focused its research on the late-18th and early-19th-century enslaved community representing field hands, domestic servants, and skilled laborers and artisans. This paper will focus on the ceramic assemblages excavated from those areas and will discuss similarities and differences in decorative styles, vessel forms, and ceramic types using a vessel-based analysis. Decorative styles commonly found on white refined earthenwares will be discussed in detail and argued to represent personal choices made by enslaved households as well as the overall availability of market goods at Montpelier.


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Cite this Record

Dipt, Painted, and Printed Wares: Ceramic Assemblages from Enslaved Homes as Evidence of Personal Choice at James Madison's Montpelier. Kimberly A Trickett. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 433784)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 478

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America