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Friend or Foe: Constructing the National Identity of Japanese American Children in Amache, a WWII Internment Center

Author(s): April Kamp-Whittaker

Year: 2015

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Summary

During World War II thousands of Japanese American families were relocated from the west coast to the interior of the United States. Internment along with rampant racism and cultural stereotyping focused public attention on individuals of Japanese descent in this county and raised questions about identity and national allegiance. Research from Amache, the internment camp located in Colorado, is used to explore issues of children’s national identity and broader understanding of the war.  Photographs, toys, and individual stories demonstrate how Japanese American children navigated the complicated politics of the 1940’s to construct individual narratives of self.


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Friend or Foe: Constructing the National Identity of Japanese American Children in Amache, a WWII Internment Center. April Kamp-Whittaker. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 433845)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
1940'S


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 325

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America