Features of War: The Archaeology of Defense, Skirmish and Occupation at Captain Jack’s Stronghold, Lava Beds National Monument

Author(s): Jacqueline Y. Cheung

Year: 2015

Summary

Approximately 60 Modoc warriors and their families occupied and held off over 600 U.S. Army soldiers and volunteers at Captain Jack’s Stronghold during the 1872-1873 Modoc War. A 2008 wildfire revealed a remarkably intact Indian War battlefield that includes Modoc and U.S. Army camp areas, stacked rock fortifications and artillery emplacements. The 2008-2010 archaeological survey identified, mapped, and documented hundreds of features and artifacts, which provide insights into how the Modocs protected and provided for their families under siege, and how the rugged, rocky landscape affected U.S. Army troop movements and strategies.

Cite this Record

Features of War: The Archaeology of Defense, Skirmish and Occupation at Captain Jack’s Stronghold, Lava Beds National Monument. Jacqueline Y. Cheung. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 433960)

Keywords

Temporal Keywords
1873

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 170