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Unloading History: Schooner-Barges, Self-Unloaders, and the Development of a Modern Maritime Landscape

Author(s): Caitlin Zant

Year: 2015

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Summary

Throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, the Great Lakes were at the center of rapid technological advancements in shipping and shipbuilding. The diverse demands for trade and unique geographic characteristics of the region created the necessity for highly specialized vessels and technologies. While the development of steam propulsion and use of metal hulls aided this progress, advancements in unloading systems helped propel shipping into the twentieth century.  The emergence of self-unloading schooner-barges represents an important chapter in this progression. Though examples of this early construction are no longer available above the water, the archaeological remains of converted self-unloaders Adriatic, EMBA, and Transfer provide an opportunity to study the catalysts of maritime innovation and the role these played in the development of the region’s unique maritime landscape. The self-unloading technology implemented on these vessels offers insight into early twentieth century trade, transport, and Great Lakes maritime communities.


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Cite this Record

Unloading History: Schooner-Barges, Self-Unloaders, and the Development of a Modern Maritime Landscape. Caitlin Zant. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 434035)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
1880-1930


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 405

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America