The Potential for the Archeology of the Civilian Conservation Corps in National Parks

Author(s): Allison Young; Bailey Lathrop

Year: 2015

Summary

During the 1930’s, the Civilian Conservation Corps played a critical role in the development of infrastructure in the National Park Service. Companies of men built visitor centers, park housing, roads, bridges, and trails. These various projects laid the foundation for park accessibility as well as greatly improving the visitor experience. While undertaking these projects, the men lived in established base camps as well as project specific smaller camps. Although the camps were torn down at the end of the program, in many instances an archeological signature still remains. This paper discusses the potential for the archeological investigation of CCC related sites in national parks. Case studies are discussed from Scottsbluff National Monument and Ozark National Scenic Riverways.

Cite this Record

The Potential for the Archeology of the Civilian Conservation Corps in National Parks. Allison Young, Bailey Lathrop. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 434138)

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Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 374