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The Big Data History of Archaeology: How Site Definitions and Linked Open Data Practices are Transforming our Understanding of the Historical Past

Author(s): Joshua J Wells ; Robert DeMuth ; Kelsey Noack Myers ; Stephen J Yerka ; David Anderson ; Eric Kansa ; Sarah Kansa

Year: 2016

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Summary

This paper examines big data patterns of historic archaeological site definitions and distributions across several temporal and behavioral vectors. The Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA) provides publicly free and open data interoperability and linkage features for archaeological information resources. In 2015, DINAA had integrated fifteen US state archaeological databases, containing information about 0.5 million archaeological resources, as a linked open data network of digital repositories, artifact collections, textual resources, and other science and humanities information sets. Informed queries of DINAA can help us consider relationships of historic sites across spatiotemporal divides, cultural and behavioral categories, and disciplinary taxonomies through a bridging ontological system which can be openly expanded or edited by interested practitioners. DINAA does not contain sensitive site details, and data are rendered in a grainy (ca. 20-km2) tile grid. Informative query results can be exported or linked to other systems through stable web identifiers.


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The Big Data History of Archaeology: How Site Definitions and Linked Open Data Practices are Transforming our Understanding of the Historical Past. Joshua J Wells, Robert DeMuth, Kelsey Noack Myers, Stephen J Yerka, David Anderson, Eric Kansa, Sarah Kansa. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434412)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 252

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America