tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Commemorative Hauntings: Race, Ghosts, And Material Culture At A Civil War Prison Camp

Author(s): Julia King

Year: 2016

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

Ghosts and other spectral forms have a history of use as literary devices for safely ‘remembering’ particularly traumatic events. Beyond the literary, in the everyday, lived world of the vernacular, ghost stories can also reveal trauma—what geographer Steve Pile refers to as a "fractured emotional geography cut across by shards of pain, loss, and injustice." Like ruins, ghosts and other haunted places are often about coming to terms with grief and with loss. Nowhere is that more true than at Point Lookout, the now-state-owned site of a Civil War-era POW camp for Confederate war prisoners. This paper explores how race, ghosts, and the ruins of the prison camp intersect in a landscape now focused on water-based recreational activity. At Point Lookout, ghosts have come to serve a commemorative function, keeping the forces of the modern world at bay.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Commemorative Hauntings: Race, Ghosts, And Material Culture At A Civil War Prison Camp. Julia King. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434482)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
19th Century


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 755

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America