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Examining the landscape of enculturation at Euro-American Children’s Homes (Orphanages) and Native American Boarding Schools

Author(s): Paulina Przystupa

Year: 2016

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Summary

Institutions played an important part in American culture during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, serving segments of society that could not take care of themselves. While asylums, orphanages, and boarding schools have come to have a negative connotation in modern American culture, these places played a formative role in the enculturation and care for multiple generations and ethnicities in the United States. Particularly, children’s homes or orphanages and Native American Boarding Schools served to educate and raise underprivileged American children and were subject to different ideological constraints because of the different ethnicities that they served. This paper investigates a sample of Euro-American Orphanages and Native American Boarding schools to examine how choices of location and layout reflected cultural beliefs about enculturation of Euro-American and Native American children at the time by using landscape archaeology theory, geographic information systems, and archival archaeology.


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Examining the landscape of enculturation at Euro-American Children’s Homes (Orphanages) and Native American Boarding Schools. Paulina Przystupa. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434514)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 428

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America