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The Landscape of Slavery within Thomas Jefferson's Academical Village: The Pavilion VI Garden

Author(s): Benjamin P Ford

Year: 2016

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Summary

Thomas Jefferson's Academical Village was built, operated and maintained on the labor of enslaved African Americans. The University of Virginia's unique built environment, the context of slavery within larger central Virginia, and the responsibilities of the white faculty and staff who supervised the operation of the educational institution created a context for slavery unlike other academic institutions. This paper will focus on the landscape of slavery in the nineteenth-century University of Virginia gardens. Many of us today know the University gardens as contemplative retreats. However within five years of opening, these enclosed spaces were transformed into the living and work places for free and enslaved African Americans. Analysis will review recent research within the Pavilion VI garden and the identification of a second quarter of the nineteenth-century 'office' supporting the resident of the Pavilion.


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The Landscape of Slavery within Thomas Jefferson's Academical Village: The Pavilion VI Garden. Benjamin P Ford. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434531)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 553

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America