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Interpreting Slavery from Urban Spaces: African Diaspora Archaeology and the Christiansted National Historic Site

Author(s): Alicia Odewale ; Josuha Torres ; Thomas H. Foster

Year: 2016

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Summary

The Christiansted National Historic Site in the US Virgin Islands has served as a landmark site documenting the history of African Diaspora and Danish occupation in St. Croix from 1733-1917. Three archaeological projects surrounding the Danish West India and Guinea Company Warehouse have uncovered a wealth of cultural resources that have lasting implications for the largely Afro-Caribbean descendent Crucian community and for future interpretations of urban slavery in Caribbean contexts. Following a stump removal, exposing the remains of a Danish military stock warehouse containing 3,186 artifacts, two excavations conducted in the courtyard of the park recovered over 2,000 artifacts and the approximate location of the royal slave quarters within the warehouse. These new projects have brought into focus the importance of the enslaved Afro-Caribbean peoples that lived within this site, but have also revived local interest in investigating the story behind a multicultural society almost 300 years in the making. 


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Cite this Record

Interpreting Slavery from Urban Spaces: African Diaspora Archaeology and the Christiansted National Historic Site. Alicia Odewale, Josuha Torres, Thomas H. Foster. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434600)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
1733-1917


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 405

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America