New Perspectives on Human-Plant Histories in Delaware: Acheobotanical Data from the Route 301 Mega Project.

Author(s): Justine McKnight

Year: 2016

Summary

This paper will focus on the interpretation a large flotation-derived floral dataset produced from seven archaeological mitigations accomplished under the Route 301 Mega Project.   A diverse range of features (wells, cellars, smokehouses, root cellars, middens, kilns, slave quarters) were sampled from a variety of domestic, agricultural and small-scale industrial contexts that comprised the social landscape of rural Delaware during the 1700’s and 1800’s.  The collective floral data make a valuable contribution to the project’s research themes of site economy, tenancy, and slavery in the post-colonial landscape.  The project affords a unique opportunity to explore a wide range of people-plant relationships at a series of diverse but closely tied historic sites.  In addition to generating a powerful regional dataset, the archeobotanical studies were significantly enhanced by close collaborative and coordinated research involving multiple CRM firms and government agencies. 

Cite this Record

New Perspectives on Human-Plant Histories in Delaware: Acheobotanical Data from the Route 301 Mega Project.. Justine McKnight. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434617)

Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 328