Nineteenth Century Homesteads in Wyoming and Montana and a comparison to Mongolian "Homesteads" on the Russian Mongolian Border.

Author(s): Dudley Gardner; William Gardner

Year: 2016

Summary

A.Dudley Gardner and William Gardner

In north central Mongolia the Buryats (Buriad) herders build log cabins for homes. While different from nineteenth century log cabins built in the American West, there are similarities. As part of our analysis we noted that the proximity of houses to corrals in both northern Mongolia, Montana, and Wyoming are similar enough to one another that choices on how to utilize space in herding cultures may be based on economic and environmental considerations that are informed by cultural preferences but are primarily driven by animal needs instead of cultural mandates.  In this paper we will focus on how construction and use of wooden structures lead to a distinct material culture foot print that reflects the economics of herding and the environment the herders lived in.

Cite this Record

Nineteenth Century Homesteads in Wyoming and Montana and a comparison to Mongolian "Homesteads" on the Russian Mongolian Border.. Dudley Gardner, William Gardner. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434655)

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Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 58