tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Comparative Archaeological Analysis of Ship Rigging During the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

Author(s): Grace Tsai

Year: 2016

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

The first two decades of the seventeenth century saw a period of rapid technological advancement in shipbuilding, including ships’ rigging. This paper analyzes the changes in rigging seen in artifacts excavated from wrecks spanning from AD 1545 to 1700. Compiled from the most recent publications and/or personal correspondences, the list of artifacts include: blocks, sheaves, pins, deadeyes, chainplates, parrels, cordage, sails, and other miscellaneous parts. These remains will be analyzed to provide an archaeological timeline of when certain rigging features began appearing, such as changes in building material, wood grain, size, and shape.

The majority of our knowledge on rigging previously came from historical sources, iconography, or ship models, because rigging is rarely preserved. This paper ends with a comparison of the historical sources on rigging with the compiled archaeological data.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Comparative Archaeological Analysis of Ship Rigging During the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Grace Tsai. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434658)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 75

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America