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Railroads, America, and the Formative Period of Historical Archaeology: A Documentary and Photographic Investigation into the Historic Preservation Movement

Author(s): Lauren Alston Bridges

Year: 2016

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Summary

The twentieth century, the formative period of historical archaeology, is marked by an ideological shift from the fervent consumerism and industrialism of the nineteenth century, towards a growing institutional concern for the nation’s finite natural and historical resources. A focused case study of twentieth century railroad stations highlights various themes pertinent to the discussion of the role of historical archaeology in the Historic Preservation Movement, which focuses on preservation and interpretation of resources. Each railroad station provides a unique view into the past and present local, state, and federal legislation and ideologies that directed the station’s construction, destruction or renovation, and adaptive reuse or preservation. This study of mostly extant railroad stations further provides an opportunity for dialogue between federal/state agencies, local communities, and historic practitioners, which facilitates the formation of legislation and ideologies that will shape the next 50 years of historic interpretation and preservation in the United States.  


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Cite this Record

Railroads, America, and the Formative Period of Historical Archaeology: A Documentary and Photographic Investigation into the Historic Preservation Movement. Lauren Alston Bridges. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434724)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
Twentieth Century


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 468

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America