War-time Metal Production, Reappropriation, and Use: Spatial Patterning and Metal Technology at an early Seventeen Century Pequot Village

Author(s): Megan K Willison

Year: 2016

Summary

Site 59-73 is believed, based upon its location and archaeological assemblage, to be the location of several wigwams burned down during the English retreat after the Mystic massacre on May 26, 1637 as described in John Mason’s A Brief History of the Pequot War (1736:32). This village is believed to have been a response to the impeding war with the English. As such, its assemblage and spatial patterning provide a unique perspective into the use and reuse of metallic trade objects during the Pequot War and the ways in which villages are spatially organized generally and in response to war-time economies. By studying the cuprous and ferrous artifacts recovered from the site, a preliminary model of Pequot organization and use of domestic space can be analyzed as well as the adaptations and technologies employed by the Pequot in a war-time context.

Cite this Record

War-time Metal Production, Reappropriation, and Use: Spatial Patterning and Metal Technology at an early Seventeen Century Pequot Village. Megan K Willison. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434825)

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Keywords

Temporal Keywords
17th Century

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 988