Connecting Section 106 and The National Historic Preservation Act to People: Creative Mitigation in the Public Interest

Author(s): John T. Eddins; Virginia Busby

Year: 2016

Summary

Reflecting on NHPA 50 years after its passage, it is its public relevance, engagement, and inclusiveness that increasingly enable it to protect the valued heritage of our diverse peoples.  Implemented wisely, with broad stakeholder involvement, and integrated with environmental considerations, NHPA, Section 106 in particular, can directly support future economic, cultural, and environmental sustainability.   From its beginnings NHPA provided flexibility that we have gradually grown more comfortable in utilizing.  At the end of a Section 106 review, the resolution of adverse effects to historic properties through creative mitigation relevant to the public interest has the potential to engage a more diverse group of stakeholders and to build a stronger support base for historic preservation.   This paper explores the increasing possibilities for and utilization of creative mitigation in the Section 106 process including those that meaningfully consider social, economic, cultural, and environmental contexts.

Cite this Record

Connecting Section 106 and The National Historic Preservation Act to People: Creative Mitigation in the Public Interest. John T. Eddins, Virginia Busby. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 435024)

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 890