Slipware Philadelphia Style: Case Study from Recent Excavations at the Museum of the American Revolution Site

Author(s): Juliette J. Gerhardt

Year: 2016

Summary

Slipware ceramics have been unearthed in large quantities at archaeological sites around Philadelphia, most recently, at  the site of the future Museum of the American Revolution at the corner of 3rd and Chesnut Streets in Old City. What is known as the Philadelphia style was a mixing of two European traditions of slip decoration brought across the Atlantic with the earliest settlers: first English and then German. While many of the slip trailed designs appear similar, they vary in simple ways that make them individually unique. It is clear that these wares were produced in large quantities and that the potters were deliberately and repeatedly using particular patterns. This paper examines the frequency, range and variation of the patterns on this site’s slipware dishes to determine how far it might be possible to establish a chronological sequencing to the designs which, in turn, could shed light on the potters themselves.

Cite this Record

Slipware Philadelphia Style: Case Study from Recent Excavations at the Museum of the American Revolution Site. Juliette J. Gerhardt. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 435038)

Keywords

Temporal Keywords
Historic

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 481