tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Spiritual Wayfarers and Enslaved African Muslims: New insights into Yarrow Mamout, Muslim Slaves and American Pluralism

Author(s): Muhammad Fraser-Rahim

Year: 2016

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

This paper will examine the encounter between Africa, Islam and American history in the antebellum period of the U.S from first hand accounts of enslaved Africans. Yarrow Mamout was a Muslim Fulani enslaved in 1752, and manumitted in 1796. He purchased property in Georgetown in 1800, and there is currently an archaeological investigation on his former property. Using original Arabic documents, this research explores the spirituality, literacy and religious tolerance of enslaved African Muslims in order to understand Yarrow’s plight. Arabic documentary sources also provide new interpretations of common religious symbolism, iconography, and American/Islamic visual motifs whose Arabic roots have gone unnoticed.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Spiritual Wayfarers and Enslaved African Muslims: New insights into Yarrow Mamout, Muslim Slaves and American Pluralism. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 435087)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 985

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America