The Archaeology of Refugee Crises in Greece: Diachronic Cultural Landscapes

Author(s): Kostis Kourelis

Year: 2017

Summary

The escalation of the Syrian Civil War caused a refugee crisis in Greece as thousands of people crossed the Aegean, leading to tragic loss of life. When Balkan neighbors closed their borders in 2016, some 50,000 migrants and refugees were trapped in Greece. The country responded by a dispersing this population throughout the country in new camps over abandoned sites like army camps, tourist resorts, commercial spaces, gymnasia, fair grounds, and even archaeological sites. Using lessons from the archaeology of the contemporary world, we apply remote sensing, media analysis, and limited field observation to document camps in real time and to address ephemeral urbanism. Refugee camps have been a permanent reality in Greece for a century. The paper also considers camps from the 1912-14 Balkan Wars, the 1922 Asia Minor Catastrophe, World War II, and the Greek Civil War and outlines a comparative archaeology of crisis.

Cite this Record

The Archaeology of Refugee Crises in Greece: Diachronic Cultural Landscapes. Kostis Kourelis. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435153)

Keywords

Temporal Keywords
Modern

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 366