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Society for Historical Archaeology 2017

Part of: Society for Historical Archaeology

Society for Historical Archaeology 2017


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Documents

  • A 1611 Blockhouse and Earthworks for the Protection of Cattle: Virginia’s Earliest Bovine Husbandry, near Jamestown (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    From the earliest years of the English colonization of Virginia, Bos taurus played a significant role in settlement as a source of meat, dairy products, and draft power. Following the "Starving Time" winter of 1609/1610, when everything wild and domestic that could be eaten was consumed, including human flesh, on-the-hoof animals, as opposed to barreled beef, entered the colony.  These animals soon were being taken by Native Americans.  Thus, upon his arrival in May 1611, Sir Thomas Dale ordered...

  • The 1839 Parker Academy: On the Frontier of Transformative Resistance and Social Justice (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The Parker Academy, founded in 1839 in southern Ohio, was the first secondary school in the country to house multiracial, coeducational classrooms. Furthermore, several primary sources suggest it was also a participatory component of the Underground Railroad network. This paper highlights our findings of recent excavations and continuing archival research to explore how the school was a site of everyday resistance under a framework of transformative change through education for a multi-racial...

  • 18th-Century San Antonio Spanish Colonial Mission Complexes: An Evolution, American Revolution, and Tejano Ranchos1 (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Recent historical archaeology studies have provided new perspectives of indigenous interaction with Spanish Colonial Missions in the United States. By 1718, Texas colonists were the product of Spanish and native intermarriage for over 200 years before their arrival. Few studies have considered the multicultural aspects’ effect to the historic landscape and archaeological record. An emic perspective of how 18th-Century Tejano Ranchos evolved from the Spanish Mission complex has yet to be...

  • 19th Century Clay Pipes from Jacksonport State Park, Arkansas (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Excavations at the Jacksonport State Park over the 2014 to 2015 field season have produced over 65,000 artifacts. This material has providing information about the lives of Jacksonport's residents from its prominence and period of historical significance (1852-1892) and on to the subsequent poor house era (1910-1953). Within this extensive collection are several campaign/ president pipes imported from Germany from circa 1830 to circa 1870. The identifiable specimens include presidential...

  • 19th Century Entertainments From A Small Plantation In Alexandria, Virginia: Archaeology At Shuter’s Hill (44AX175) (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The archaeology of childhood is underrepresented in the archaeological literature. Identifying children’s toys can be complex since many recreational objects, such as Frozen Charlottes, dominos, marbles, harmonicas and mouth harps, were used by both children and adults. Other toys found at this archaeological site are solely associated with children, primarily metal military figures and dolls. Shuter’s Hill, located in Alexandria, Virginia, was a small plantation located near Washington, D.C....

  • 300 Years: Archival and Archaeological Investigations at the Mission San Antonio de Valero (The Alamo) Probable First Site (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The Mission San Antonio de Valero (known as The Alamo) was established in 1718, by Father Antonio Olivares. The mission was believed to be located in its first location for about 12 months before it was moved to a second location. The third and final location is where it is located today in Alamo Plaza. The first site location has been lost for almost 300 years. In February, 2013, Kay Hindes, City Archaeologist for the City of San Antonio located a number of artifacts that are colonial in age in...

  • 37 Pounds of Beads!: Reconstructing Provenience and Looking for Change and Continuity in an Orphaned Collection (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    This paper aims to understand processes of change and continuity by examining how the introduction of European manufactured glass beads in the 16th-19th centuries affected preexisting native shell bead consumption strategies in Southern California. Data from two different coastal burial sites that were occupied by the Tongva/Gabrieliño people will be analyzed; one from an 1877 excavation on Santa Catalina Island that has virtually no provenience information, and another from more recent...

  • The 3D Digitization of the World Trade Center Wreck (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Accurate documentation of cultural heritage materials is the lynchpin for all aspects of archaeological investigation. When it comes to the reconstruction and interpretation of shipwrecks, this is especially true. The more accurate and true to life the documentation is, the more accurate the interpretation and reconstruction of a ship will be. The methods by which ships have been documented have evolved rapidly over the years, though each new and innovative method is tied to foundational...

  • 3D in the Toolbox: An Operational Comparison of Acoustic, Photogrammetric, and Laser Scanning Methodologies Tested at Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary in 2016. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The clear, fresh waters of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary offer an ideal testing ground for acoustic and light-based imaging systems. During the 2016 field season, Thunder Bay researchers conducted several field operations to acquire, process, and compare side scan sonar, multibeam sonar, laser-scanner, and photogrammetric data at numerous archaeological shipwreck sites. The resulting analysis provided valuable insights into this array of remote sensing systems in terms of their ability...

  • 3D Printing an Archaeological Site Map: Photogrammetric Recording and Printing of the Pillar Dollar Wreck (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    During the 2016 East Carolina University field school at Biscayne National Park, photogrammetric data was collected to 3D print a sitemap using a ZCorp 3D printer. This printer is a resin-based printer that uses a 24-bit color pallet to print a full range of color. In addition to Photoscan, this process utilizes a free, open-source 3D rendering and animation software called Blender to perfect  and render the model usable for 3D printing software. The sitemap was then 3D printed for use in the...

  • 3D Printing for Submerged Heritage: A Comparative Study in Structured Light and Photogrammetry (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    This paper seeks to compare the 3D modeling techniques of photogrammetry and structured light to create 3D models of propellers found on a variety of shipwrecks. Additionally, this project seeks to determine best practices for 3D printing in situ heritage on submerged archaeological sites, focusing particularly on structural elements. This project focuses on three main case studies: Montana at Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, and two shipwreck sites near the Outer Banks of North...

  • Abandoned Rural Settlements and Landscape Transformations in the Early Modern and Modern Period: Innovative Methodological Approaches of Historical Archaeology within a Central European Context (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Settlement and landscape transformations in Central Europe during the Early Modern/Modern period were beyond interest until 1990s and, ironically, remain insufficiently recognised despite better preservation of sites, larger collections of artefacts and broader data sources. Nevertheless, complexity of sites, often with extensive destructions, and a requirement of integration very variable data sources (especially a combination with written evidence and historical maps is significant) generate a...

  • Accuracy of Underwater Photogrammetric Methods: The Case Study of the Invincible Wreck Site (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    This report presents an accuracy analysis of the 2016 underwater photogrammetric survey of the HMS Invincible, an at-risk British wreck of historic import, which afforded the opportunity to compare the three-dimensional models generated by a variety of widely available cameras. In a two-phase project, photogrammetric data from the Invincible wreck site was compared against swath bathymetry, and the cameras used onsite were tested on reference objects under controlled pool conditions. The results...

  • Adding and Subtracting: Manipulating Ceramic Manufacture to Signal Cultural Identity Among Indigenous Populations of the San Antonio Missions (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The analysis of ceramic assemblages was a corner stone of Dr. Gilmore's approach to Spanish Colonial Studies.  Following this tradition, the presentation uses the results of pertrographic analyses of native-made ceramics assemblages from several of the South Texas and coastal plains missions to track the manipulation of manufacture techniques among ethinically distinct indigenous groups.  The combination of microscopic ceramic fabric characteristics with macroscopic decorative approaches suggest...

  • Advances In Laboratory and Field Use Of Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (pXRF) and LASAR ABLATION-ICPMS (LA-ICP-MS) Technologies In Field Archaeological And Combined Survey Format (CSF) Surveys (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Major advances in the Laboratory and Field Use of Portable X-Rarchaeologyay Fluorescence (pXRF) and the newly developed LASAR ABLATION ICP-MS (ICP-MS) in archaeology are enabling investigators to gain new insights into the elemental and chemical content of laboratory and field samples of artifact, soil and plant materials.  Many of these advances have come directly from laboratory studies and field geochemical investigations initiatiated by mineral industry and governmental organizations and...

  • Advancing interpretation of USS Monitor through digital reconstruction (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    It can be difficult to interact with a large artifact actively undergoing conservation treatment and desalination. The artifact is almost constantly submerged in a treatment bath making it impossible or impractical for the archaeologist to study the particularities and imperfections of the object. This can postpone significant archaeological interpretation for years. By digitally reconstructing USS Monitor’s iconic gun turret, using photogrammetry and laser scanning, USS Monitor Center staff at...

  • Advancing The Study Of Cultural Frontiers In Post-Medieval Ireland – Native Innovation In The Face Of Colonial Power (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Historical archaeology in the north of Ireland offers much to the global debate on identity and cultural interaction. There, social order in the post-medieval period has been portrayed as representing a culturally isolated conservative society: a point of contrast with ‘civilised’ Europe. North Irish elites are traditionally believed to have used earth and timber indigenous sites as alternatives to a supposedly more mainstream European architectural lexicon. Recent studies challenge this...

  • An Aerial Micro-Topographical Landscape Survey on Montserrat, West Indies (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    During the 2016 field season, the Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat (SLAM) project undertook an intensive micro-landscape survey of targeted areas within the northern and north-central regions of Montserrat. A mountainous, volcanic island of the Lesser Antilles situated within the southeastern Caribbean, pedestrian survey on Montserrat presents a particularly challenging set of logistical difficulties and calls for alternative strategies of data acquisition, especially the use of...

  • African Americans, Resistance, and the Spiritual Alteration of the Physical Environment on the Levi Jordan Plantation, Brazoria County, Tx (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In 1986, the University of Houston began conducting archaeological excavations at the Levi-Jordan Plantation in Brazoria County, Tx in an effort to recover contextual material that would reveal information about the enslaved community, sharecroppers, and tenants who lived at the plantation. Established in 1848, the plantation was home to nearly 150 slaves at its pre-civil war peak, and was a major producer of both sugar and cotton. Early excavations of the curer’s cabin and church revealed...

  • Afro-Brazilian Spaces of Worship: Late Nineteenth Century Archaeological Findings from Salvador, Bahia (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    This paper discusses the transformation of domestic living quarters into spaces of Afro-religious worship in Salvador, Brazil, during the late nineteenth century. This is accomplished through the presentation of historical sources that demonstrate the pervasiveness of this phenomenon, and especially, analysis of spatial and artifactual data unearthed during archaeological excavations in a house basement. The study uses historical, ethnohistorical and ethnographic analogies with present day...

  • After the Railroad: An examination of Chinese in Sandpoint, Idaho (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Like other western American railroad towns, Sandpoint, Idaho, saw an influx of thousands of Chinese workers during railroad construction in the twilight of the 1800s. Most workers moved on as construction of the railroad continued down the line. Examination of a Chinese laundry excavation provides an interesting snapshot of the lives those workers who stayed and made Sandpoint their home. This business was also a residence and the collection provides an opportunity to study both the private and...

  • Afterlives of Slavery on the Post-Emancipation Caribbean Plantation (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    This paper offers some opening remarks that introduce the conceptual framework informing this session. A rich body of archaeological literature has investigated plantation slavery in the Caribbean region, but far less attention has been paid to the post-emancipation landscape and the significant transformations that affected the lives of laborers. We seek to address how a focus on the post-emancipation Caribbean plantation landscape can provide unique insights into how notions of freedom were...

  • The Alexandria Archaeological Protection Code: Managing Archaeology within the Framework of City Development (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Archaeological investigations at 220 S. Union Street are just the first of a series of upcoming excavations along Alexandria’s historic Waterfront. On November 18th, 1989, the City Council of Alexandria, Virginia adopted the one of the first local archaeological protection ordinances in the country, which requires an assessment of the potential archaeological significance prior to "ground disturbing activity" in the City. This framework provides an environment through which Alexandria...

  • All Inclusive: an Archaeological Investigation and Material Analysis of Tabby Remains at Middle Place Plantation (9CH158), Ossabaw Island, Chatham County, Georgia (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    This investigation includes field methods from terrestrial archaeology, buildings archaeology, and incorporates digital survey techniques and material analysis to better understand the development and history of Middle Place Plantation (9CH158).  We will survey tabby structures throughout the Georgia coastal region including industrial buildings, martial architecture, slave quarters, and structures of the elite to position Middle Place within the context of Ossabaw Island and the broader coastal...

  • All Them Ditches: The Spanish Colonial Water Management System of San Antonio de Bexar (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Remnants of one of the largest and most extensive Spanish Colonial acequia water systems in the United States can be found in San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas. Acequias contributed to the flourishing of the missions and colonial farming settlements in San Antonio de Bexar. This extensive system of ditches redirected water in various parts of present day Bexar County for agricultural and household purposes. At least six principal acequias and numerous secondary branches have been identified with...

  • Alsatian Foodways in 19th Century Texas: A Faunal Analysis of Remains from the Biry House Excavations (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The Jacob Biry House in Castroville, Texas was a multi-generational household occupied by Alsatian immigrants and their descendant community. The faunal remains from one feature, a lime slaking pit, were analyzed to determine the subsistence practices and foodways of Alsatian descendants who occupied the house in the 1920s. The specimens were analyzed and compared to Binghamton University’s comparative collection and published zooarchaeological texts to identify species and elements. Techniques...

  • America’s ‘Haven of Health’: Health and Recreation at Turn of the Century Excelsior Springs, Missouri (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Once known as America’s "Haven of Health", the city of Excelsior Springs, Missouri was home to an estimated 40 unique mineral spring and well sites.  This collection of mineral waters is one of the largest in the world, and reputation quickly spread of their healing properties.  After the founding of the city in 1880, hundreds and thousands flocked to the area daily to enjoy the various health spas and recreational facilities.  Preliminary analysis of artifacts recovered at the Regent Spring...

  • Analysis Of Amidships On The Emanuel Point II Shipwreck (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Over the past four years University of West Florida archaeologists have excavated the amidships area of the Emanuel Point II (EP II) shipwreck, which was once part of the ill-fated 1559 Spanish colonizing expedition led by Tristán de Luna y Arellano. During excavation, staff and students were able to uncover and record the mainmast step and location for two bilge pumps. Archaeologists also recorded and systematically removed over 30 disarticulated timbers related to the pump well enclosure....

  • An Analysis of the Reasons behind the Increase in Speed of Dutch and British Ships, 1750-1830 (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Previous studies indicate that there is a general increase in ship speed for both British and Dutch wooden sailing vessels during the time period 1750-1830. Using logbooks digitized by the Climatological Database of the World’s Oceans project (CLIWOC), this study seeks to identify the reasons behind this increase. The introduction of copper plating in the late 1700s had a significant effect on the speed of British ships, but historical documents reveal that copper plating was less frequently...

  • Analysis of Unidentified Ceramics in Historic Saint Charles, Missouri (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    An excavation behind a bed and breakfast located on Main Street in historic downtown Saint Charles, Missouri unearthed several large, unidentified sherds of ceramics. The focus of this research is to use comparative collections, ceramic identification guides, public records, the Saint Charles County Historic Society archives, and any other necessary means of research to identify the ceramics, their possible use, and who they might have been used by. 

  • Analytical Chemistry and Archaeological Collections: A Case Study on the Continuing Research Value of Previously Excavated Materials. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In 2008 archaeologists and chemists at the University of Idaho initiated a collaborative program using analytical chemistry to study archaeological materials. Initial work focused on collections from the northwest but it is now nationwide in scope.  The work had provided insight on a variety of questions including the reuse of historical bottles, traditional Chinese medicinal practices as well as the identification of many previously unknown materials.  The work has also proved to be an...

  • Anarchy in the New-Found-Land: Winter Houses and Decentralized Power in the Rural North Atlantic (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Up until recently, historical archaeologists working on the island of Newfoundland have focused primarily on studying the rich archaeological remains of the summer cod fishery and the plantations left behind by the island’s mercantile aristocracy. However, this work overlooks the social realities of the island that primarily consisted of small coastal communities inhabited primarily by working class fishing families living far away from any obvious authority figures. This paper seeks to...

  • Anatomy of a 16th-century Spanish galleon: The evolution of the hull design (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    During the 16th century, the evolution of the Spanish galleon as an oceangoing warship followed a different pattern than in other European nations. The galleon was the product of a maritime tradition developed in Spain that combined Mediterranean and Atlantic design and construction methods. It was designed to protect the fleets of the Indies run, the first permanent interoceanic system from Europe to America, and to defend the Spanish territories overseas and the Iberian Peninsula. This paper...

  • An Anchor in the Mesa Top: Reexamining Who Settled the West (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The popular narrative of the settling of the western United States during the homestead era revolves around the idea of rugged individuals dispersing across the landscape, and making "improvements" that developed into settlements. As this poster will illustrate, this narrative does not apply to all who homesteaded the west. In the early twentieth century an individual with an intellectual disability purchased a homestead on the Parajito Plateau in Northern New Mexico. During World War II this...

  • "And the Land Is Not Well Populated": The End of Prehistory on Pensacola Bay (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The sixteenth century was marked by Spanish expeditions that brought the prehistoric lifeways along Pensacola Bay to an end. Accounts from the 1559 Luna expedition indicate a meager population of Indian fishermen lived along the bay of Ochuse. Collectively, this and subsequent documentary evidence illustrates movements of people in and out of the region and hints at the dramatic cultural changes already underway. Interestingly, archaeological evidence supports the idea that the native...

  • And why would you want to study that? Reflections on Post-Conquest Archaeology (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    When Dr. Elizabeth Scott visited us in Quebec City during her last sabbatical leave she was interested in post-Conquest collections from the îlot des Palais and Île-aux-Oies sites. We were happy to oblige as the years immediately following the British Conquest are understudied, ignored and perhaps forgotten at times by archaeologists in our region. Is this due to the fact that we work in Quebec City, best known for its French flavour? And for its promotion of French heritage? After the Conquest,...

  • Another Brick in the Wall: A Pedagogical Approach to Excavations at a 19th -century Brickyard (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Incorporating archaeology within the high school curricula fosters an interest in archaeology and site preservation. The Milton High School Archaeology Project provides students the opportunity to experience and participate in archaeological research. At a 19th-century brickyard, students learn anthropology and their local history through hands-on excavations. Through the use of Project Based Learning (PBL) students conduct archaeological and historical research, and present their work in the...

  • Antioch Colony and the Archaeology of Texas Freedmen Descendants (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In the aftermath of the Civil War, a small group of black families founded Antioch Colony in rural Hays County, TX. This enclave of kin-related households rapidly became a beacon for other emancipated blacks who were drawn to the colony’s church and school. The settlement’s growth and stability hinged upon the success of farming households to work together, stay out of debt, and retain their hard-earned land. Archaeological and oral history research focused on the descendants of these pioneering...

  • Application of Alternative Light Source to Identify Painted Markings on a Model 1917 Renault French Tank (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    A very large battle damaged artifact, a M1917 French Renault tank, at the National World War I Museum in Kansas City, Missouri was subjected to analysis with an ALS (altenative light source) in order to identify and bring out faded painted markings. The ALS aided in identifying the tank as a vehicle assigned to the First French Tank Regiment. Work witht the ALS also helped more clearly identify the tank maintenance crew as Americans mechanic trainees who scratched their names on the inside of...

  • Approaches to Sample Selection for Strontium Isotope Testing Within Historic Cemetery Contexts: An Illustrative Example from the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery Project (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Strontium isotope analyses have become a vibrant frontier for historic cemetery research in the United States. Isotopic analyses can make vital contributions to our understanding of the past, particularly in the categories of demographics, temporal refinements, and individual identifications. This analytical method can be understood as a catalyst for research- similar to a catalyst in a chemical reaction. When utilized in combination with multiple lines of evidence, strontium analyses become a...

  • Archaeogaming Theory: Explaining Post-Entanglement Dualist Artifacts (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Archaeogaming, the study of the intersection of archaeology in (and of) video games), explores a unique class of ordinary artifacts that effortlessly occupy both real and virtual worlds. This presentation explains archaeogaming's many branches while providing a new way of discussing digital games, dismissing their appearance as simply media objects, treating them instead as both archaeological artifact and site created by both hardware and software into vehicles of iconoclasm. As archaeologists,...

  • Archaeological And Archival Investigations Of A Norwegian Farmstead In Bosque County, Texas (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Bosque County, Texas, has a rich history as the most successful Norwegian settlement in the state, attracting immigrants throughout the latter half of the 19th century. Ole Finstad was no exception to this Texas fever; immigrating in 1871 at the age of 51, he acquired 160 acres in Bosque County, built a rock house, and spent his days farming and raising cattle. His descendants continued this tradition for the next 84 years, and the ruins of the original rock house still stand today. This paper...

  • Archaeological Investigation of the Brookgreen Plantation, South Carolina (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Brookgreen Plantation was one of the largest and most productive rice plantations in the United States prior to the Civil War. Owner Joshua John Ward held more than 1,000 Africans in slavery on this and his other plantations. The remains of Brookgreen Plantation are now a part of Brookgreen Gardens, an outdoor museum established in 1931 by Anna Hyatt Huntington.  Brookgreen Gardens is expanding its public interpretation of the historic plantations on its property, including the lives of enslaved...

  • An Archaeological Investigation Of The Submarine Resurgam (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The early steam powered submarine Resurgam was designed and built by an eccentric curate from Manchester, England, and was lost in mysterious circumstances off North Wales in 1880.  The submarine was relocated in 1995 and was investigated in 1997 by a mixed team of avocational and professional divers, archaeologists and conservators during the SubMap project.  A summary of the results of this and later investigations is presented along with a new analysis of the Resurgam submarine's...

  • Archaeological Investigations of the Treviño-Uribe Rancho (41ZP97), San Ygancio, Zapata County, Texas (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Recent archaeological investigations of foundations and anomalies encountered during a previous ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey at the Treviño-Uribe Rancho (41ZP97) provided insight into the lives of ranchers on the Spanish Frontier in the borderlands region. In 1820, Jesús Treviño was granted the land as part of the Nuevo Santander Colony (c. 1748-1835).  By 1830, Treviño constructed a one-room, fortified shelter as an outpost.  Additions to this structure created a...

  • Archaeological Survey of Tennessee's Rosenwald Schools (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The Tennessee Division of Archaeology completed an archaeological site survey of Tennessee’s Rosenwald Schools in 2017.  These schools for African-American students were built between 1912 and 1932 and partly funded by the Julius Rosenwald Fund. This program helped construct 354 schools, 9 teachers’ homes, and 10 industrial shops in Tennessee. Researchers were able to locate most of these sites, assess their archaeological integrity, and add them to the statewide archaeological database...

  • Archaeologies of the After-lives of Slavery (Discussant Comments) (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Discussion of the themes raised in the  papers presented in this session.

  • Archaeology and Offshore Development: Advancing our Archaeological Understanding through Collaboration with Industry (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The last 15 years have seen a massive increase in offshore development around the UK which has provided archaeologists the opportunity to find and examine new sites from areas of seafloor, in deeper waters and further from the coastline than was previously possible.   In particular, collaboration between archaeologists, geologists, engineers and other stakeholders has significantly advanced our understanding of preservation of inundated palaeolandscapes over large areas, and the potential for...

  • The archaeology of a Seattle city block from 1880s squatters, Great Northern Railroad workers, and the establishment of Pike Place Market. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    An inconspicuous city block near today’s Pike Place Market held the remains of a 19th century shantytown, evicted in 1902 to prepare for the Great Northern Railroad tunnel beneath Seattle. Construction monitoring of a modern development yielded the remnants of middens and privies dating as early as the 1880s. Spared from the city’s major regrade projects, photographs, maps, and artifacts demonstrate that this parcel was once part of the dense carpet of "squatter’s cabins" covering the city’s...

  • An Archaeology of Care in the Bakken Oil Patch (North Dakota, USA) (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The University of North Dakota Man Camp Project has used archaeology to engage seriously the issues of workforce housing and industrial landscapes in the Bakken. Our work proceeds with a focus not on the ebullience (or catastrophe) of the Bakken, but rather on the material culture of housing in a dynamic extractive landscape. We do not advocate, nor do we analyze or make policy recommendations. Our work in the field epitomizes, however, an archaeology of care for the communities in which we...

  • Archaeology of Excursion Steamboats: Recent Work on Late 19th Century Shipwrecks of the Midwest (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Shipwrecks in inland lakes in the United States provide scholars with an opportunity to study the nautical archiotecture and technological design of early excursion steamboats. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, inland lakes were important areas for resort communities, and leisure destinations for urban centers. An important aspect of these spots were steamboats designed exclusively for pleasure excusrions. Recent sonar imaging of the shipwreck Hazel A. in Reeds Lake, Michigan has...

  • The Archaeology of Gendered Resistance at the Industrial Mine in Superior, CO (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The Industrial Mine at Superior, operating from 1895 to 1945, was one of many coal mines situated within a region known as the Colorado Northern Coal fields. It is exceptional only in that it was one of the largest coal producers in the area and because it was the sole mine in the region with both a company town and company store. This paper examines how camp housing structured the lives of women living at the Industrial Mine, as well as how women altered the camp. Through their gendered...

  • An Archaeology of Inventories: An 18th Century Jesuit Winery and Distillery in Nasca, Peru (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Estate inventories offer archaeologists a synchronic assemblage of material culture including the built environment, and an opportunity to understand how aspects of such an assemblage relate to one another and the landscape from the perspective of the assessor. Two such inventories exist for the Hacienda La Ventilla, an annex of the Hacienda San Joseph de La Nasca owned by the Cuzco Jesuits. The first dates to the sale of La Ventilla by a lay proprietor in 1706 and lists the structures,...

  • The Archaeology of Refugee Crises in Greece: Diachronic Cultural Landscapes (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The escalation of the Syrian Civil War caused a refugee crisis in Greece as thousands of people crossed the Aegean, leading to tragic loss of life. When Balkan neighbors closed their borders in 2016, some 50,000 migrants and refugees were trapped in Greece. The country responded by a dispersing this population throughout the country in new camps over abandoned sites like army camps, tourist resorts, commercial spaces, gymnasia, fair grounds, and even archaeological sites. Using lessons from the...

  • Archaeology of repression and resistance during Francoist dictatorship (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Structural and physical violence are common instruments used by dictatorial regimes in order to impose their hegemony and to gain legitimacy within local communities. At the same time, repression usually entails resistance from individuals and societies, which may be active or passive, physic or ideological. Both repression and resistance are materialized in landscapes and objects which can be analysed through Archaeology, telling stories not visible by other means. In this paper, we will...

  • Archaeology of the American Southwest: Comparing the Mythology of the Frontier with Daily Life in Fort Davis, Texas (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The mythology of the frontier has captured the imaginations of generations of Americans. Images of cowboys, ranchers, and gold miners have become the idealized subjects of wild west shows, dime novels, paintings, and films.  Even today, the legends of Buffalo Bill, Jesse James, and Calamity Jane are still widely known.  In an attempt to examine how these romantic myths have shaped the lives of those living in the Southwest, this poster presentation will analyze 20th century cultural material...

  • The Archaeology of Working Class Identity at the Industrial Coal Mining Camp in Superior, Colorado (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The history of coal mining in Colorado is a substantial portion of the narrative of the state’s history and broader labor issues that are still relevant today. This paper will study how working class identity is negotiated and revealed through material and spatial remains of worker housing at the Industrial Mine in Superior, Colorado. The Industrial Mine was in operation from 1895 to 1945 and played a key role in the development of labor unions and laws, which laid the foundation for the modern...

  • Archaeology on Rogers Island in the Hudson River (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In the summer of 2017, field work resumed on Rogers Island for the first time in 19 years.  Covered with barracks buildings, huts, tents and hospitals, Rogers Island was the centerpiece of a 16,000-man British military encampment during the French & Indian War.  The current phase of archaeology conducted by SUNY Adirondack and Plymouth State University will assist in the development of walking trails on the island.

  • Archaeology on the World's Oldest Wooden Tugboat: Documenting and Restoring M/V Arthur Foss (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Northwest Seaport Maritime Heritage Center in Seattle is one of the oldest maritime heritage organizations in the US, and its fleet flagship is also one of the oldest of its kind. The historic wooden tugboat Arthur Foss (1889) represents Pacific Northwest wooden shipbuilding at its height, and a long tradition of maritime commerce on the Pacific coast. This vessel, while technically operational, has never had a major restoration or significant documentation of its construction features. No...

  • Archaeology over the Edge: Recent Work on the Hanging Flume in Western Colorado (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In the spring of 2017, Alpine Archaeological Consultants, Inc. (Alpine) completed an inventory and site testing of the Hanging Flume and associated sites in western Montrose County, Colorado.  The Hanging Flume was a 10-mi.-long bracket flume that was suspended along the cliff walls above the San Miguel and Dolores river canyons.  It was constructed between 1889 and 1891 by the Montrose Placer Mining Company in association with a hydraulic gold placer mining operation along the banks of the...

  • Archaeology's Role in Changing a Generation of Youth: Exploring Education and Intersectionality (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Archaeology in the Community (AITC) is an urban-based archaeology organization founded with the intent of providing science opportunities to marginalized youth who would have never been exposed to archaeology through their education system. This paper highlights how intersectional theory is used by AITC to expose and increase students’ knowledge of archaeology as a science. Intersectionality theory emphasizes the structural intersection of social categories and studies the concept of...

  • Archaeology, Education, and Gentrification: The View From San Francisco (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    San Francisco, and the Bay Area more broadly, is currently an epicenter of gentrification due largely to the tech economy.  Higher education is implicated in these processes too, though, as universities expand due to increased enrollment pressures.  This paper explores how these intersecting issues have played out during the first semester of teaching "Introduction to Archaeology" for the UC Berkeley/UC Extension San Francisco Fall Program for Freshmen as part of the American Cultures Engaged...

  • The ArcheoBlitz and Citizen Science at Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site, North Dakota. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    As part of the NPS centennial celebration, Knife River Indian Villages NHS and the Midwest Archeological Center hosted a citizen-science event focused on engaging local area Middle School students. The ArcheoBlitz was designed as a multi-day event to highlight research activities focused on the history and resources preserved at the park. The event was loosely modeled on Bio-Blitz events that have successfully been used by the NPS and National Geographic Society to gather natural resources...

  • #Archeology: Loose Lips Save Slave Ships? (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The discovery of the hulk of an 18th-century sailing ship during archeological excavations at the Hotel Indigo site in the City of Alexandria, Virginia attracted the attention of local, national and international corporate media and trended on social media sites. Reflecting on this project’s 15 minutes of fame and media attention associated with other recent high-profile archeological projects in the Washington D.C. metro area, various issues including unequal access to media, knowledge, and...

  • Archival Digitization and Accessibility in a Small Island Nation: A Case Study (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Archaeologists, anthropologists, researchers and educators are all aware of crucial role that archival documents play in the discovery process. Those who work in the Caribbean are painfully aware of the absence of accessible archived documents in many island nations.  During the summer of 2016, through a grant with the British Library Endangered Archives Program (EAP914), the Zemi Foundation began working with the Turks and Caicos National Museum on the development of a National Archives. A...

  • Are ROVs The New VIP?: Developing A Supplemental Method For Recording Shipwrecks (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    This paper highlights the benefits of utilizing low-cost remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) to photograph and record video footage of several shipwrecks in the Great Lakes. Using such methods, data can be used to create photogrammetric models and orthomosaics of wreck sites, which can then facilitate the creation of scaled, two-dimensional digital site plans. In comparing digital site plans to those produced using traditional mapping techniques, it is possible to determine the accuracy of the...

  • Artifact or Evidence? The Role of Material Culture at War-Related Forensic Recovery Scenes (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Artifact collection and analysis is a foundation of all archaeological research, and the methods used to record and draw meaning from the material culture we encounter on archaeological sites are generally standardized across subdisciplines.  But field decisions about what to keep, what to disregard, and how to record and quantify it all are invariably informed, to some extent, by our research goals.  When it comes to war-related sites excavated by U.S. Department of Defense teams with the...

  • Artifacts from Luna’s Settlement and Shipwrecks (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

      Thousands of artifacts have been recovered from the two shipwrecks associated with Tristán de Luna y Arellano’s 1559 settlement attempt and recently hundreds of artifacts have now been recovered from the associated land site. Even at this early stage in the terrestrial work, we have the unique opportunity to make many interesting comparisons between the two assemblages regarding the relative proportions of different functional categories and the presence/absence of fasteners, armor, and...

  • Artifacts from US Military Installation: Dusty Treasures or Unwanted Objects (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Collections allow archaeologists and other scholars the opportunity a means to view past lifeways. Those lifeways are connected to past histories that are situated in a time and place. Context is everything! However, what happens when artifacts are lost misplaced, or mis-catalogued? Archaeologists across the globe are working on shoe-string budgets and are being asked to do more with less. Due to these shrinking budgets the collections that we painstakingly curate often are given less care and...

  • Assessing the Damage and Remaining Archeological Potential of Commercially Salvaged Sites Mozambique Island: the case of São Sebastião fortress wrecks. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Following discovery of sea route around the Cape by Vasco da Gama in 1498 that opened the maritime trade between Europe and India, Mozambique Island-which served as capital of Portuguese East Africa from 1507 to 1898-came to play an important role in mediating the maritime interactions that subsequently emerged. The Island’s underwater archaeological heritage that results from this history has been heavily impacted over the last decade by commercial salvage activity as assessed in 2015 by the...

  • B-24 Liberator Aircraft: Survey Results and Partnerships for Upcoming Recovery Project (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In 1944, factory workers and community members from Tulsa, OK financed the last B-24 Liberator built by the Tulsa Douglas Aircraft plant. They named her Tulsamerican, signed and wrote messages on her fuselage, and sent her to Europe with a part Tulsa crew. She crashed off the coast of Croatia after a bombing mission but was never forgotten as a WWII community icon. After imaging and preservation surveys in 2014 and 2015, researchers are now preparing for the recovery of remains and personal...

  • Background For Luna: Archaeology At The University Of West Florida (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Archaeology at UWF was started in 1980 primarily to study the rich prehistoric archaeological resources in Pensacola and northwest Florida.  The program has taken several unexpected and fruitful turns into public archaeology, urban archaeology, historical archaeology, and underwater archaeology.  The Early Spanish colonial resources, both documentary and archaeological, have been remarkable.  We initially focused on the 1698-1763 Spanish frontier presidios, but in 1992 the first 1559 Luna...

  • The Backyard Shipwreck: The 2017 Lake Champlain Maritime Museum Field School Exploration Of A Shipwreck in Basin Harbor (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The 2017 Field School held by the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum explored an unknown wreck lying in Basin Harbor. One of the primary reasons for the start of the museum, the wreck has been known about since the inception of the Basin Harbor Club around the harbor. Yet the identity, time period, and type of vessel still remain unknown. This year's field school aimed to answer some of these questions. Basing the research design on the previous research conducted on site in 1982 and 2016, the field...

  • Balls, Cocks, and Coquettes: The Dissonance of Washington’s Youth (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Powerful messages concerning ideal gender roles are significant, yet latent features of presidential biographies. Most contemporary authors suggest that Washington succeeded despite the efforts of his mother, Mary Ball Washington. Biographers tend to be most offended by Mother Washington when she exercised agency. Archaeological investigations at Washington’s childhood home in Stafford County, Virginia underscore the dissonance between the material culture of his youth and popular narratives...

  • The Battle of KS-520: Results from a survey of a WWII battlefield off North Carolina's coast. (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    When WWII came to the United States, the east coast became part of a massive naval battlefield. Few other areas better represent this activity than the waters off North Carolina. Monitor National Marine Sanctuary has been studying sites in the region associated with the Battle of the Atlantic for nearly ten years.  When convoy KS-520 was attacked by a German u-boat escort vessels sunk U-576 in a counterstrike. As a result, a stricken freighter and the u-boat that sunk it were lost. In 2014 the...

  • Battle of Midway: 2017's Exploration for Sunken Aircraft (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In May of 2017, the NPS' Submerged Resources Center and NOAA's Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument conducted an exploratory survey for sunken aircraft from WWII's Battle of Midway in June of 1942. What was found spanned the centuries of maritime activity at the Atoll including the battle. It also displayed on the seafloor all aspects of the military's long use of the island as a base, and their lasting impact on the island landscape. Today multiple federal agencies manage Midway as a...

  • The Battle of the Atlantic, Torpedo Junction, and the Archaeological Record: The Battle of the Atlantic Research and Expedition Group’s Campaign 2021 (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The waters off the Outer Banks of North Carolina were the scene of some of the most intense activity on the US East Coast by German submarines in World War II, particularly during 1942.  Today evidence of that struggle remains in the form of the wrecks of roughly 100 ships and submarines.  The Battle of the Atlantic Research and Expedition Group is a 501(c)3 educational nonprofit corporation made up nearly exclusively of avocational archaeologists and historians all of whom are recreational or...

  • The Battle of the Wabash and The Battle of Fort Recovery: Public Interpretation and Education (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Ball State University’s Department of Anthropology has completed six years of archaeological and historical research at the battlefield of the Battle of the Wabash (1791) and the Battle of Fort Recovery (1794), two significant Northwest Indian War battles that took place in present day Fort Recovery, Ohio. Research was funded by multiple National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program grants. We present the public interpretation results of this research, specifically the use of: 1)...

  • The Battlefields Are the Only Thing We Have: Archaeology, Race, and Thanatourism in the Trans-Mississippi South (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Archaeology has a long history with the tourism industry. Thanatourism focuses on sites associated with death and violence, such as battlefields, and conflict archaeology can be a powerful means to connect with the public and aid in the development of war-related sites as tourist draws. For American Civil War sites, thanatourism is a potential boon to depressed rural southern economies and a means to improve preservation and interpretation of archeological sites. Archaeologists can have a...

  • Baudrillard in Castroville, Texas: Traces of Contemporary America in the Biry/Tschirhart Families’ Home (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In his 1986 travel memoir Amérique, Jean Baudrillard defined America as a constant flow of things: cars and highways, screens and electricity, rivers and geological silence. Everything flows as if the continental vastness of the U.S. could be reduced to a smooth surface that flattens historical time. The result is a landscape defined by regular surfaces that are symmetrical to the predictability of social practices. In this paper, I argue that America’s flow of things has a genealogy, and that...

  • Be Polite, Be Professional, But Have A Plan To Not Kill Every Shipwreck You Meet: Fusing Traditional Methods, and Cutting-Edge Geospatial Modeling to Adaptively Manage a Maritime Cultural Landscape Under Siege. (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In the battle to preserve vulnerable historic maritime resources, recovery efforts after the unprecedented devastation of Superstorm Sandy highlighted a desperate need to locate, identify, and catalog the submerged resources of New Jersey. Today, resiliency undertakings, new development projects, plans to address rising sea levels and severe storms, have all encountered maritime archaeological resources. With over 1,600 known historic shipwrecks crowding only 150 miles of Atlantic coastline, and...

  • The Beeswax Wreck Project: The First 10 Years. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The Beeswax Wreck Project is an all-volunteer, non-profit effort to identify and locate a proto-historic wreck locally known as the Beeswax Wreck of Nehalem, Oregon, USA. The results of the ten-year effort by a multi-disciplinary team are reported, including the identification of the vessel as the Manila galleon 'Santo Cristo de Burgos', lost in 1693. Remote sensing and dive survey efforts to locate hull deposits that could confirm the identity of the vessel will be discussed. Despite the lack...

  • Before the Emergence of the Modern World (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Historical Archaeology, as properly defined, is the archaeology of the Modern World - plus or minus the last half millennium of human global evolution. Various inception dates have been suggested for the initiation of the processes that produced modernity:1415. 1453, 1481, 1492,1494, 1500, 1550 or even 1946. To fully understand the Modern World and its archaeology, its precursors and roots also need to be recognized. Techological diffusion spheres, interregional trade, continential movements of...

  • The Beginning of the End - An Economic Impact Analysis on Late 19th-Century Charcoal Production in the Roberts Mountains of Eureka County, Nevada (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    During the late 19th-century, mining companies in Eureka, Nevada depended on a steady flow of charcoal to fuel their smelters. This charcoal was produced in the hills and mountain ranges surrounding Eureka by teams of woodcutters, laborers, and charcoal burners also referred to as the Carbonari. As the demand for fuel persisted, land around Eureka was deforested and charcoal production expanded into areas well-away from the smelters. By the mid-1880s the demand for charcoal began decreasing as a...

  • Behind the Scenes of Hollywood: The Intersectionality of Gender, Whiteness, and Reproductive Health (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In ongoing research at Hollywood Plantation, a 19th century rural plantation in southeastern Arkansas, intersectionality, with its roots in Black feminist theory, plays two roles. It is an analytical tool for uncovering intersecting power relations, such as gender, whiteness, and reproductive health, as they emerged in the late 19th century. As patent medicines were increasingly marketed to women, medicine bottles provide a lens into rural upper class white women’s healing practices and the ways...

  • Best Practices for 3D Recordation and Visualization of Historical Archaeological Sites (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The use of 3D recordation and visualization techniques on archaeological sites has expanded dramatically in recent years. In response to the popularity of these technologies, European practitioners have developed the London Charter for the Computer-Based Visualization of Cultural Heritage as a foundation for best practices. This paper discusses the London Charter and how it may be applicable to American Historical Archaeology. Issues include appropriate technology selection, documenting sources...

  • Between the Mythic and the Material: Texas Exceptionalism and Early Austin History (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Popular histories portray the Republic of Texas capital city of Austin between 1839 and 1846 as a crude frontier town, characterized by Anglo-American heroism and material deprivation. By stressing these aspects of Republic-era life, such histories omit many facets of early Austin’s social history, including enslaved forced migration and individualism that diverge from this narrative. This research carefully examines extant objects, architecture, and primary source documents to suggest an...

  • Beyond Battlefields: Incorporating Social Contexts into Military Sites (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Although it has been more than a century since the US Civil War was fought, battles regarding interpretation and the public memory of the conflict continue to rage. Hundreds of sites along the eastern seaboard are consecrated to this period, with many preservationists and other historical organizations dedicated to sterile interpretations of these battlefields. These interpretations fail to capture social contexts of the site, as well as the development of the landscape since the Civil War. The...

  • A Birds Eye View of War: The Role of Historic Maps and Aerial-Based Imagery in the Archaeological investigation of Unaccounted-For U.S. military Personnel. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    As "snapshot" documents of the past, historical maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery are a valuable source for the archaeological investigation of major conflicts throughout the past eight decades.  Although many of these documents were initially acquired and then maintained in secret in the context of major conflict or clandestine purposes, decades later they are proving to be of much benefit and unintended value for historical and archaeological research.  This paper will present an...

  • Black and White and Red All Over: The Goodrich Steamer Atlanta, 1891-1906 (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Often overlooked in the story of the westward settlement of America, transportation of passengers and cargo through the Great Lakes and northern river systems accounted for a substantial volume of migrant travel. From the mid-1800s through the 1930s, passenger steamers on the Great Lakes were designed to combine luxury and speed. The Goodrich Transit Company, for example, was one of the longest operating (1856-1933) and most successful passenger steamship lines on the Great Lakes. Passage on the...

  • Blackbeard's Beads: An Analysis And Comparison of Glass Trade Beads From The Shipwreck 31CR314 (BUI0003) Queen Anne's Revenge Site Beaufort Inlet, North Carolina (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In 1717, the French slaver La Concorde de Nantes was captured by pirates and renamed the Queen Anne’s Revenge (QAR). It is believed that the pirates removed the enslaved Africans before taking the ship. However, some scholars believe the pirates sold the slaves in North Carolina. One marker of a ships involvement in the slave trade are beads. Physical examination of beads is used to determine the date and country of manufacture and used to correlate a ships involvement in the trade. Thus far,...

  • Blacksmithing for Fun and Profit: Archaeological Investigations at 31NH755 (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Archaeological investigations at an early 19th century historic site along the banks of the Lower Cape Fear River near Wilmington, North Carolina, uncovered evidence of a small blacksmith shop and adjacent domestic occupation.  Archaeological features included the footprint of the burned blacksmith shop, approximately 15 by 15 feet in size, along with a dense scatter of charcoal, slag, and scrap iron.  Adjacent to this building were structural posts and artifacts that appear to be related to a...

  • Blazing Trails and Chasing Scoundrels: Kathleen K. Gilmore’s contribution to Spanish Colonial Archaeology in Texas and the Relentless Pursuit of Presidio Captain Felipe Rabago y Teran. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    No history of Spanish Colonial archaeology in Texas is complete without addressing the accomplishments of Dr. Kathleen K. Gilmore. When reviewing her nearly 50-year career as an archaeologist, one is hard-pressed to find a Texas mission, presidio, rancho, or settlement that Dr. Gilmore did not visit, research, excavate, or write about. Among her most important projects were the missions and presidio of San Xavier in present-day Milam County. While researching the site, Dr. Gilmore became...

  • Blood, Sweat and Queers: Roller Derby and Queer Heritage (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Queer theory is a new and developing realm of heritage management; with the listing of historic places Stonewall National Monument and the Bayard Rustin Residence, queer heritage is attaining broader recognition. Investigations into the broader patterns of queer history will expose additional spaces and places with important associations to queer communities on multiple levels. Roller derby’s queer-normative environment has become a center of community-building in the last twenty years,...

  • Boca, California- House On The Hill Project: Results of 2016 Field Survey (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    During 2016, fieldwork was carried out in the California Sierra Nevada Mountains at Boca, a late 19th century company town that provided lumber for the construction of the Southern Pacific Railroad and the Comstock mine. Boca was also one of the largest producers of naturally harvested ice, selling to individuals and companies, including the railroad. Use of iced railcars provided the means for the transcontinental railroad to successfully ship perishable goods long distances, giving later rise...

  • Bones and Barbeques: A Zooarchaeological Study of Alsatian Foodways at Castroville, Texas (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    Emigrating from Alsace, a contested border region, to the contested frontier of Texas, many Alsatians had to adjust to life in the American West. This included maintaining their identities as Alsatians in the face of a changing landscape, which manifested through different ways in quotidian life, including choices in food. Through Number of Identified Specimen counts, researchers use faunal assemblages associated with habitation sites to identify patterns of the frequency with which various...

  • Bones Wearing Bow Ties: Differential Preservation in Funerary Taphonomy (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    The skeletal remains excavated from Scott Cemetery were well preserved while, in contrast, coffin and textile remains were generally poorly preserved. A soil pH test was conducted, with the sandy soil being an alkaline 7.8. The well preserved bone, adipocere formation, and poor textile preservation reflect established literature on the effects of alkaline soils. Burials with a high degree of roots, likely from remains of a tree that had grown through the grave shafts, were less preserved than...

  • Bottles at the Biry House: Consumption and Economic Choice in a Texas-Alsatian Household (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In 2014, students from Binghamton University excavated several historic features in the rear yard of a Texas-Alsatian homestead in Castroville, Texas.  This poster presents the analysis of the glass bottles found in Feature 7, a well built in the 19th century and filled in during the mid-20th century.  During this time, the well became a dumping ground for a range of historical materials discarded by later occupants of the house and other local residents, like the American Legion next door.  The...

  • Bricks On Black Water: A Comparative Landscape Analysis of an 1830s Brickyard (2018)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    As a result of the development of a large U.S. military complex in the newly obtained territory of Florida, Pensacola experienced a historic Brick Boom in the 1830s. The opportunity to profit from brick manufacturing prompted many individuals to establish brickyards along the region's many waterways. The Scott Site is one such site, where excavations have been ongoing since 2008 via a joint-education program between Florida Public Archaeology Network and Milton High School. The resulting...

  • Bricks on Black Water: Excavations and Public Education at an 1830s Gulf Coast Brickyard (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT

    In the mid-1820s the newly acquired American port town of Pensacola began to develop a huge military complex. Resulting from the demand for brick needed in the construction of a number of third-system masonry coastal forts and a Naval Yard, Pensacola developed a substantial brick industry almost overnight. Today, little remains of the many brickyards that supplied millions of bricks for forts located from New Orleans to the Dry Tortugas off the coast of Key West, Florida. Over the last several...

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Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America