Advancing The Study Of Cultural Frontiers In Post-Medieval Ireland – Native Innovation In The Face Of Colonial Power

Author(s): Paul J Logue

Year: 2017

Summary

Historical archaeology in the north of Ireland offers much to the global debate on identity and cultural interaction. There, social order in the post-medieval period has been portrayed as representing a culturally isolated conservative society: a point of contrast with ‘civilised’ Europe. North Irish elites are traditionally believed to have used earth and timber indigenous sites as alternatives to a supposedly more mainstream European architectural lexicon. Recent studies challenge this narrative, showing that native elites were highly innovative in their approach to tradition and identity, using designed landscapes and buildings in a sophisticated and adaptive manner. Based on evidence from the Americas, Mrozowski et al (2015, 123-130) have shown that tradition and innovation are not dichotomous but co-dependent, active processes. This paper presents evidence to support that conclusion, showing that north Irish elite society maintained deep roots while routinely innovating in order to negotiate the projection of English colonial power.

Cite this Record

Advancing The Study Of Cultural Frontiers In Post-Medieval Ireland – Native Innovation In The Face Of Colonial Power. Paul J Logue. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435412)

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Keywords

General
Identity Innovation Native

Geographic Keywords
United Kingdom Western Europe

Temporal Keywords
Mainly AD1500-1600

Spatial Coverage

min long: -8.158; min lat: 49.955 ; max long: 1.749; max lat: 60.722 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 323