tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

18th-Century San Antonio Spanish Colonial Mission Complexes: An Evolution, American Revolution, and Tejano Ranchos1

Author(s): Sergio A. Iruegas

Year: 2017

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

Recent historical archaeology studies have provided new perspectives of indigenous interaction with Spanish Colonial Missions in the United States. By 1718, Texas colonists were the product of Spanish and native intermarriage for over 200 years before their arrival. Few studies have considered the multicultural aspects’ effect to the historic landscape and archaeological record. An emic perspective of how 18th-Century Tejano Ranchos evolved from the Spanish Mission complex has yet to be incorporated into the archaeological literature, particularly the impact of successful Tejano Ranchos on the American Revolution. San Antonio Founding Initiative Project researchers have reviewed and analyzed original Spanish Colonial written texts, verified 20th-century translations, incorporated oral histories, and evidence from the archaeological record at three historic Tejano Ranchos. Researchers offer a model of five evolutionary stages that are important for our understanding of land tenure, illicit and sanctioned trade, and identity that comprise aspects of Spanish Colonial Mission archaeology.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

18th-Century San Antonio Spanish Colonial Mission Complexes: An Evolution, American Revolution, and Tejano Ranchos1. Sergio A. Iruegas. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435242)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
18th Century


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 736

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America