Adding and Subtracting: Manipulating Ceramic Manufacture to Signal Cultural Identity Among Indigenous Populations of the San Antonio Missions

Author(s): Steve A. Tomka

Year: 2017

Summary

The analysis of ceramic assemblages was a corner stone of Dr. Gilmore's approach to Spanish Colonial Studies.  Following this tradition, the presentation uses the results of pertrographic analyses of native-made ceramics assemblages from several of the South Texas and coastal plains missions to track the manipulation of manufacture techniques among ethinically distinct indigenous groups.  The combination of microscopic ceramic fabric characteristics with macroscopic decorative approaches suggest that potters added or subtracted macroscopic features of the ceramic vessels to signal changes in ethnic affiliation while retaining the microscopic features of the ceramic fabric relatively intact.  At the petrographic level of analysis the characteristics of the clay fabric tend to be more directly reflective of clay source localities.  Ethnohistoric data on population censuses is used to track residence and movement of distinct ethinc groups between missions and correlate them to patterns in ceramic asemblages.

Cite this Record

Adding and Subtracting: Manipulating Ceramic Manufacture to Signal Cultural Identity Among Indigenous Populations of the San Antonio Missions. Steve A. Tomka. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435240)

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 682