tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Living on the Landlord’s Island: Creation of the Island Home and Improvement in 18th to 20th Century Irish Residential Housing

Author(s): Ian Kuijt

Year: 2017

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

If, as Henry Glassie argues, community is the space between hearths of Irish houses, then in many ways it was the landlord who framed the spatial geography and materiality of the 19th Irish household.  From 1750 to around 1910, individual absentee landlords owned the substantial islands of Inishturk, Inishbofin and Inishark inhabited by between 300 to 2,500 people.  As owners of these remote islands, and the villages and houses on their shores, the landlord leased land and seaweed rights, and houses to families that fished and farmed, often collectively.  Tenants were structurally discouraged from improving rented buildings, or investing in development.  In this presentation I discuss the material linkages between the transition around 1900 from tenant-farming under control of the landlord to individual ownership, and material footprint of national policy of improvement as seen through the lens of changing residential housing.

 


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Living on the Landlord’s Island: Creation of the Island Home and Improvement in 18th to 20th Century Irish Residential Housing. Ian Kuijt. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435172)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
Post 18th century


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 508

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America