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Three Lives of Belair Plantation: Colonial Governor’s Retreat to Gentleman Farmer’s Racing Stable

Author(s): James Gibb ; Kathleen Clifford

Year: 2017

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Summary

Belair began in the 1740s as the plantation of Samuel Ogle, one of Maryland’s proprietary governors and a prominent member of one of the colony’s most influential extended families. Field archaeology and archival research identified two significant alterations to the mansion and curtilage: removal of surrounding dependencies and construction of a telescoping addition in the early 19th-century, and removal of the addition and construction of flanking hyphens and wings in the early 20th century, as well as construction or reconstruction of terraces. The early 20th-century alterations, to current sensibilities, created a truer statement of Palladian architectural principles than did Ogle’s original design. This statement, however, came at a time when the owners transformed the plantation-cum-farm into a retreat and stable for racing horses.


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Cite this Record

Three Lives of Belair Plantation: Colonial Governor’s Retreat to Gentleman Farmer’s Racing Stable. James Gibb, Kathleen Clifford. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435218)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 175

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America