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"Their complaint was that they did not get enough to eat": Landscape of Child Labor at the Blackfeet Boarding School, Montana

Author(s): William White ; Brandi E. Bethke

Year: 2017

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Summary

The boarding school system of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was designed by the United States government as a formal program to eradicate Native American cultural identities and lifeways. It was a system that removed Native children from their families and forced them into to a way of life that garishly clashed with their traditional beliefs and culture. One of the primary goals of the Cut Bank Boarding School on the Blackfeet Reservation in Browning, Montana was to transform children of the Blackfeet Tribe in northern Montana into sedentary farmers. Corruption, cruelty, and mismanagement forced these children to endure forced labor and deprivation while operating the school’s farm. Recent research uncovered a landscape of child labor and disregard for the welfare of those who the government was committed to protect. Through the lens of archaeology and archival research, the story of these children is being told.


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Cite this Record

"Their complaint was that they did not get enough to eat": Landscape of Child Labor at the Blackfeet Boarding School, Montana. William White, Brandi E. Bethke. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435288)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 553

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America