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Using Available Archaeological Insights into a Maritime Landscape: Can We Learn From Beads and Porcelain on the Beaches of Mozambique Island—Even When these Have Been Collected for Commercial Purposes?

Author(s): Celso Zefanias Simbine

Year: 2017

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Summary

This paper presents the results of the archeological survey of porcelain shreds and beads that were collected from beaches in the Mozambique Island maritime landscape. This assemblage represents a long history of maritime interactions dating to at least the 15th century initially focused on the Indian Ocean, but eventually also encompassing the Atlantic. It first describes the collected assemblage (which includes significant representation from the Ming Dynasty (Wanli period 15th to 16th centuries) and Qing Dynasty (17th to 20th centuries), 17th to 19the century European wares), local vernacular ware, and ceramics of various Islamic origination. It then develops an inventory of site formation processes—including shipwrecking events, regular harbor activities, and –since the 1960’s—removal and sale of some artefacts to tourists—exploring how each affects the relative presence and distributions of artefacts in the archaeological record in particular ways—ultimately with significant implications for how that record is interpreted.


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Cite this Record

Using Available Archaeological Insights into a Maritime Landscape: Can We Learn From Beads and Porcelain on the Beaches of Mozambique Island—Even When these Have Been Collected for Commercial Purposes?. Celso Zefanias Simbine. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435503)


Keywords

General
CZS

Geographic Keywords
Mozambique Sub-Saharan Africa

Temporal Keywords
21:31


Spatial Coverage

min long: 30.213; min lat: -26.847 ; max long: 40.846; max lat: -10.478 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 605

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America