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Buffalo Soldiers, Married Soldiers, and Laundresses at Fort Davis, Texas: A Nineteenth-Century Glass Analysis of Medicinal, Health and Hygiene Vessels

Author(s): Jenifer A Davis

Year: 2017

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Summary

This paper investigates the general health practices of lower ranking military communities at Fort Davis, Texas, a nineteenth-century U.S. Army instillation. Focusing on an assemblage of glass medicinal vessels collected from sites occupied by enlisted black troops, married soldiers’ families, and army laundresses, this study considers health management practices within the changing notions of health and disease in the context of nineteenth-century medical movements, including temperance, humeric medicine, and germ theory. In recognition of a medical anthropological perspective, factors such as socioeconomic class, military rank, race, gender and geographic location are also considered when reconstructing individual health experiences at the post. Further I address questions of access to army doctors and consider the possible preference of some groups for self-treatment remedies.  As part of the larger Fort Davis Archaeology Project (FODAAP) this study provides valuable insight into how various communities at the fort met the challenges of frontier military life.


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Buffalo Soldiers, Married Soldiers, and Laundresses at Fort Davis, Texas: A Nineteenth-Century Glass Analysis of Medicinal, Health and Hygiene Vessels. Jenifer A Davis. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435672)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
19th Century


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 329

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America