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The Chocolatera on the Spanish Colonial Frontier: Insights into Global Foodways and Economics

Author(s): Russell Skowronek ; Margaret Graham

Year: 2014

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Summary

If one artifact signals the birth of the modern world economy it is the chocolatera. Before the wide-spread use of coffee or tea, hot chocolate was the beverage of choice in early modern Europe and the American colonies. Found in Spanish colonial sites fat-bellied ceramic or copper jars with constricting necks and shoulders ‘the chocolatera is an artifact associated specifically with the making of this comestible. The hot beverage made of cinnamon, sugar, and chocolate was beaten to a froth in boiling water and served as a popular stimulant. To illustrate the variable forms of this artifact and chocolate within the global economy this presentation draws on archaeological and documentary evidence from both shipwreck and terrestrial sites in California, Texas, Florida, New Mexico, Mexico, the Philippines dating from the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries.


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The Chocolatera on the Spanish Colonial Frontier: Insights into Global Foodways and Economics. Russell Skowronek, Margaret Graham. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 436699)


Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-13,11

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America