Understanding African American Archaeology and Archaeological Education in Washington, DC through the Influences of Booker T. Washington

Author(s): Mary Furlong

Year: 2014

Summary

Since his speech to the Cotton States Exposition in 1895, Booker T. Washington has been an important, yet controversial figure in African American history and political thought. Washington’s speeches and writings, his personal relationships and visits to Washington, DC had a major influence on African American communities lying on the east side of the capital city during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This influence can be seen in the archaeology of these communities. Additionally, Washington’s ideas and historical presence affect how the past is taught to young people living in the greater Washington area. In this paper I will discuss how the work of Booker T. Washington can be used to theorize the archaeology of African American communities located east of the Anacostia River in Washington, DC and how this archaeology is taught to participants in a youth program called the Urban Archaeology Corps.

Cite this Record

Understanding African American Archaeology and Archaeological Education in Washington, DC through the Influences of Booker T. Washington. Mary Furlong. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 436817)

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-28,06