tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

The Machault, an 18th-century French Frigate from Bayonne. Tradition and Globalisation in Ship Construction

Author(s): Marijo Gauthier-Bérubé

Year: 2014

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

The Machault is a French frigate discovered in Chaleur Bay, Canada who sunk in 1760 during the Seven Years War. Found and excavated by Parks Canada underwater archaeologist in the 1970s, the Machault had a well-preserved cargo that has been extensively studied. The remains of the ship itself have never been studied in depth. Machault inherited of centuries of naval knowledge but the frigate also bears witness to a major forestry crisis in 18th century France and Europe. Built in Basque port of Bayonne, the Machault lay amidst a clash between the regional shipbuilding traditions and the globalisation of naval techniques in Europe. Our study of the Machault structural remains takes into account forestry practices, hull design and ship carpentry, to create the Machault’s own identity and its context of traditions, transfers and innovations in naval knowledge.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

The Machault, an 18th-century French Frigate from Bayonne. Tradition and Globalisation in Ship Construction. Marijo Gauthier-Bérubé. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437000)


Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-45,09

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America