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Partisans Versus Loyalists: Encounters With the Other in Eastern South Carolina During the American Revolution

Author(s): Steven Smith

Year: 2014

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Summary

In 1781 Loyalist officer Colonel Robert Gray described the South Carolina landscape as a ‘piece of patchwork.’ By that time in the war, Whigs and Loyalists were living within separate, discrete, politically defined and physically bounded communities. Within these communities, partisans found support from the local population in the form of food, forage, ammunition, and recruits. Beyond their own regions, lay ‘other’ communities. The ‘others’ were ripe for exploitation or punishment. This paper examines the Whig community surrounding Snow’s Island that was the base of support for partisan leader Francis Marion. East of and adjacent to the Snow’s Island region, was a Loyalist community along the Little Pee Dee River. The two communities warred throughout the course of the Revolution in a fluid give and take civil war that was not settled until the British abandoned Charleston at the end of 1782. History, archaeology, and landscape analysis provide evidence of this conflict in the form of battlefields, camps, and fortifications.


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Partisans Versus Loyalists: Encounters With the Other in Eastern South Carolina During the American Revolution. Steven Smith. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437028)


Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-48,04

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America