‘”[A] sweet life after a most fatiguing campaign”’: The Evolution and Archaeology of Military Encampments of the Revolutionary War

Author(s): Jesse West-Rosenthal

Year: 2014

Summary

Despite the breadth of information that has been recorded regarding the American Revolution, little is known about the day-to-day life of the American soldier. Much has been ingrained in the American psyche concerning the mythic lore regarding the Continental Army during Revolutionary War. The archaeology of the Revolutionary War encampment provides researchers with an uncanny glimpse into the daily lives of the Revolutionary War soldier, as well as the broader patterns that shaped the conflict. These utilized landscapes offer an opportunity to understand the Continental Army in a broader sense, as the progression of the war shaped the foundations of the military. This paper seeks to investigate how 18th-century military training formed a basis of understanding for the execution of military encampments, as well as how they evolved over the course of the Revolutionary War. Through this, this paper intends to examine the material culture of the 18th-century American and British soldiers to better understand the social, political, and environmental factors that helped mold our understanding of America’s fight for independence.

Cite this Record

‘”[A] sweet life after a most fatiguing campaign”’: The Evolution and Archaeology of Military Encampments of the Revolutionary War. Jesse West-Rosenthal. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437029)

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-48,05