Dendroarchaeological dating and authentication of historic Cherokee dwellings of the Northern Georgia Trail of Tears

Summary

The understanding of settlement patterns of Native Americans in northern Georgia has largely come from historic documents, land deeds and records, and in some cases creative speculation. Documenting sites in northern Georgia that are related to the Trail of Tears would promote the importance of the state in the history of Cherokee removal, which has long been overlooked. By using dendroarchaeological techniques, wood collected from historic sites and structures can be dated using the tree rings contained in the wood. The Chief John Ross House, in Rossville, Georgia was thought to have been built in 1791 by the chief’s grandfather. Dendrochronological techniques revealed the house to have been constructed by Ross himself in 1816. This is one of many examples of the history of a Cherokee-era dwelling being rewritten.

Cite this Record

Dendroarchaeological dating and authentication of historic Cherokee dwellings of the Northern Georgia Trail of Tears. Georgina DeWeese, Henri Grissino-Mayer, W. Jeff Bishop. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437047)

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-50,03