The Disappearing Legacy of the CCC: Spike Camps and missing material culture at Mount Rainier

Author(s): Theodore Charles

Year: 2014

Summary

During recent years, the Civilian Conservation Corps has become increasingly present in archaeological studies across the United States. Beginning in the spring of 2011, the National Park Service began a study of the Civilian Conservation Corps and their operations at Mount Rainier National Park from 1933-1941. Their history and the role of the program at Mount Rainier had immense impacts on both the environment and the present day management of federal lands. Extensive testing was done on Carbon River camp NP-5 along the confluence of the Ipsut Creek during the summer of 2011, which correlates with similar archaeological results made across the country. The lack of artifacts at large camps illustrates the importance of small isolate work camps in understanding the men working with the CCC.

Cite this Record

The Disappearing Legacy of the CCC: Spike Camps and missing material culture at Mount Rainier. Theodore Charles. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437071)

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-53,02