An Examination of Dietary Differences between French and British Households of Post-Conquest Canada

Author(s): Kristen Walczesky

Year: 2014

Summary

The examination of faunal remains from archaeological sites provides a wealth of information pertaining to the diets of past peoples. This original research focuses on the analysis of animal remains from two sites that date to post-Conquest Canada. One assemblage is from a 1780-1820s British use of a privy associated with the Intendant’s palace in Québec City. The second assemblage is from a 1780-1850s French occupation of the New Farm, located on Geese Island outside of Québec City. These assemblages were examined to gain a better understanding of how the French and British living in post-Conquest Canada expressed their ethnicity and class status through their diets. These sites also provide a unique opportunity to examine the differences between urban and rural faunal assemblages. Lastly, a comparative analysis of other French and British post-Conquest sites in and around Québec City provides a basis for comparing diets of the French and British occupants of New France.

Cite this Record

An Examination of Dietary Differences between French and British Households of Post-Conquest Canada. Kristen Walczesky. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437159)

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Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-61,08