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Secondary Colonization and the Persistence of Cultural Traditions: A Look at Ceramic Consumption in Post-Conquest Québec

Author(s): Elizabeth Scott

Year: 2014

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Summary

In settings of secondary colonization, where one European colony is conquered and colonized by another European nation, the material culture available to all residents is controlled by the conquering nation. Perhaps one of the clearest cases of this was in post-Conquest New France, where the conquering British put in place after 1760 an embargo on all goods from France. Thus, the large numbers of French residents who continued to live in Canada had access only to goods from Britain or conveyed through British merchants. Given this situation, are there any differences in the ceramic choices made by contemporaneous British and French residents in and around Québec City? Can these differences be attributed to different cultural traditions? Ceramic assemblages from the British Anderson privy (1780-1820) and the French Nouvelle Ferme (1780-1850) sites are compared in terms of ware type, decorative technique and color, and vessel form to reveal several intriguing differences.


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Secondary Colonization and the Persistence of Cultural Traditions: A Look at Ceramic Consumption in Post-Conquest Québec. Elizabeth Scott. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437160)


Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-61,09

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America