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Agents, Africans and Agriculture: The Transplantation of British Nobility in Early Carolina

Author(s): Andrew Agha

Year: 2014

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Summary

In 1674, the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper, had his most trusted colonial agents settle a fortified plantation and Indian trading post within a 12,000 acre property that defined the British frontier in Carolina. The site contained a massive cattle herd, experimental agriculture, indentured servants and enslaved Africans. This settlement, called St. Giles Kussoe, existed only until 1685. Ashley Cooper was Lord Chancellor of England, a member of the Royal Society of London, and a founding member of the Royal Africa Company. These Royal influences had a direct effect on the inhabitants of St. Giles Kussoe--one we can see through our studies. We have rarely had the chance to examine a site from this period, and recent archaeological and historical research has shed light on some of the most significant findings and events relative to the formative years of Carolina.


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Cite this Record

Agents, Africans and Agriculture: The Transplantation of British Nobility in Early Carolina. Andrew Agha. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437177)


Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-63,02

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America